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Parchment Paper

Published March 2018 Behind the Testing

How we tested

Whenever a piece of restaurant equipment becomes available to home cooks, we take notice. Replacing flimsy jelly roll pans with sturdy rimmed baking sheets changed the way we cook. Using bench scrapers and Y-shaped vegetable peelers made our prep work e efficient. More expensive and esoteric tools, such as high-powered blenders, sous vide machines, and carbon-steel skillets, have also transitioned from restaurant to home kitchens.

Recently, a low-frills restaurant product appeared on supermarket shelves: parchment paper sheets, a precut version of the rolls that we have long used to line baking sheets. Since the sheets are cut to the approximate dimensions of a standard rimmed baking sheet, no trimming is necessary, which saves time and waste. And unlike rolled parchment, which needs to be wrestled out of its box and smoothed, some parchment sheets store completely flat.

Given that not every restaurant product successfully transitions to home kitchens, we were curious but skeptical. How would these new commercially inspired products compare with traditional parchment paper rolls? To find out, we purchased 10 parchment paper products: seven rolls and three packages of precut sheets.

Parchment Performance

Parchment paper's primary function is to keep food from sticking to baking sheets (although it's handy for lots of other kitchen tasks, too). Happily, all the papers we tested produced cakes, cookies, and pizzas that were evenly baked and that released cleanly. They also performed well outside the oven. None tore under heavy pizzas or pie weights or caught fire in a 500-degree oven. (Even if products list lower maximum temperatures, we've learned from manufacturers that they're still safe to use in a hot oven.) When we sandwiched and rolled out disks of cookie dough between two sheets of each paper, none of them stuck, tore, or crumpled. So we turned our attention to how easy they were to use. In these evaluations, scores were anything but even.

For Parchment Rolls, Two Things Mattered

The user-friendliness of the rolls boiled down to two factors: size and cutting mechanism. Most were too wide. The cooking surface of a standard rimmed baking sheet measures 16½ by 11½ inches, yet most rolls were between 13 and 15 inches wide. Positioning them in a baking sheet widthwise left a wide swath of the baking sheet exposed; positioning them lengthwise forced us to trim 1 to 3 inches of paper. On the widest rolls, about 15 inches across, that trimming resulted in 20 percent waste. Only one roll measured 12 inches across, almost the same width as our baking sheets.

We also preferred rolls that were easy to tear into sheets with straight, clean edges. Success was due to both the cutting mechanism and the packaging. Some products have simple designs: The user tears the paper against the front edge of the container. Boxes that weren't sturdy were a pain to use: The cutting edge folded over and became ineffective, meaning that the parchment crumpled in the corners and tore jaggedly or jumped out of the widened opening and unspooled on the floor. Our favorite parchment roll products relied on tension: The front edge of the lid tucks inside the box (like a takeout pizza box), which holds the roll in place and provides a firm, blunt edge that facilitates crisp, clean tears.

Were Precut Parchment Sheets Better?

All the precut sheets, which measured about 16 by 12 inches, fit in a standard rimmed baking sheet without trimming. They were big enough to use when rolling out disks of cookie dough, lifting pie weights, and maneuvering pizzas around the kitchen. They were too short by a few inches to use for rolling jelly roll cakes into coils, but using two overlapping sheets was an easy work-around.

And just as with the parchment rolls, packaging influenced which products we preferred. Two had compact boxes. In one of these, the sheets were rolled together in a way that allowed us to pull out a single sheet without unspooling the whole roll. Though it was easy to separate the sheets, it was a struggle to flatten them. Even when we positioned the curled edges down, the sheets often jumped up and sprung into a tight scroll. The other product was also frustrating; it was folded in quarters and packaged in a roughly 8 by 6-inch box. The sheets were so tightly creased that even the weight of cake batter or pizza dough wasn't enough to flatten out the peaks and valleys. As a result, baked goods were marked with deep lines and Xs.

Our favorite parchment was stored flat in a large zipper-lock bag, so sheets never got wrinkled or creased. Sized just right and perfectly smooth, they practically floated into baking sheets.

The Most Practical Paper

After weeks of tearing, trimming, and flattening paper, we had a newfound appreciation for products that didn't require so much fuss. King Arthur Flour Parchment Paper 100 Half-Sheets ($19.95 for 100 sheets, plus shipping) is the only one that combines precut sheets—which eliminate the need to trim and tear—with packaging that allows them to be stored flat. This parchment slid neatly into a rimmed baking sheet and fit it well. At $0.20 per sheet (not including the shipping), our runaway favorite is priced similarly to other products in our lineup and is well worth the cost. It's the latest commercial-inspired home product that will have you wondering how you ever got by without it.

Methodology

We tested 10 parchment papers, with our lineup including a mix of rolls and precut sheets. We used the papers to bake a variety of foods (including some in a 500-degree oven), to roll out disks of cookie dough, and to roll jelly roll cakes. We also tested the papers' strength. Throughout testing, we evaluated how cleanly the baked foods released from the paper and checked them for even, consistent browning. Several users took the papers home, where they evaluated their performance and ease of use and noted how easy they were to store in kitchen cabinets and drawers. For rolls, we calculated the approximate number of sheets per container by dividing the total length by 16 inches (roughly the length of the cooking surface of a standard rimmed baking sheet). Scores from testing were averaged. Prices were paid online, and products appear below in order of preference.

Performance: We baked two kinds of cookies, jelly roll cake, and pizza with each paper, checking to see how easily foods released and if they had even, consistent browning.

Size: We used each parchment paper to line standard-size rimmed baking sheets, whose cooking surface measures 16½ by 11½ inches. Papers rated best if they fit in the baking sheets straight from the package or with minimal trimming.

Handling: Sheets of perfectly flat parchment paper were easy to use and ensured that foods baked evenly with smooth surfaces. We docked points from papers that curled, were creased, or were generally difficult to lay flat. Products that negatively affected the appearance of our baked goods lost points.

Packaging: We evaluated the design and construction of the packaging. For sheets, the best packaging allowed the paper to be stored flat. For rolls, good packaging had firm, rigid edges or sharp teeth that facilitated clean, neat tears. Products lost points if their packaging fell apart or became misshapen during testing.

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The Results

Key:
Good
Fair
Poor
Winner
Highly Recommended

King Arthur Flour Parchment Paper 100 Half-Sheets

$19.95 per package ($0.20 per sheet), plus shipping

King Arthur Flour Parchment Paper 100 Half-Sheets

These precut parchment sheets, which come in a large plastic zipper-lock bag, are the only ones in our lineup that are stored completely flat. They're also sized just right to slide easily into a standard rimmed baking sheet, although we did have to use two overlapping sheets when rolling jelly roll cakes into coils. Their superior convenience made them the runaway favorite. Don't let the purchase price distract you: The per-sheet cost falls squarely in the middle of our lineup.

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Size
Handling
Packaging
Performance
$19.95 per package ($0.20 per sheet), plus shipping
Recommended

PaperChef Parchment Rolls

Buy For $13
Purchased for $12.95 per package (approximately $0.18 per sheet) at time of testing

PaperChef Parchment Rolls

Our favorite rolled parchment paper had clever packaging: The lid fits inside the front of the box, which holds the roll in place and provides tension for neat, even tears. Even at the end of the roll, the paper was relatively easy to flatten. Our biggest criticism was that we had to trim about 3 inches from the paper to fit it in a rimmed baking sheet.

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Size
Handling
Packaging
Performance
Purchased for $12.95 per package (approximately $0.18 per sheet) at time of testing

Reynolds Parchment Paper

Buy For $40
Purchased for $5.33 per package (approximately $0.20 per sheet) at time of testing

Reynolds Parchment Paper

We liked working with this parchment paper. When the lid was tucked inside the box, it was easy to tear off sheets with clean, even edges. However, sheets had to be trimmed significantly to fit in rimmed baking sheets. The edges tended to curl, especially when the paper was near the end of the roll.

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Performance
Purchased for $5.33 per package (approximately $0.20 per sheet) at time of testing
Recommended with Reservations

Reynolds Cookie Baking Sheets

$3.48 per package ($0.16 per sheet)

Reynolds Cookie Baking Sheets

These precut sheets are folded in quarters and packed in a small rectangular cardboard box that measures 8 by 6 inches. We liked the compact storage, but the paper was very tightly creased along the folds. Even when we tried to flatten the sheets, they had sharp little hills and valleys and produced lines or Xs on cookies and cakes. While we don't care much about a line on the underside of a cookie, cookie dough rolled between two sheets of this parchment was marked on its top side as well.

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Handling
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Performance
$3.48 per package ($0.16 per sheet)

Good Cook Parchment Paper

$5.27 per package (approximately $0.35 per sheet)

Good Cook Parchment Paper

This roll was the only one in our lineup whose width matched that of a standard rimmed baking sheet, and we loved that convenience. But the product packaging wasn't as successfully designed. The boxes were beat up by the end of testing, and one side came completely unglued. Per sheet, it was the most expensive product in our lineup.

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Handling
Packaging
Performance
$5.27 per package (approximately $0.35 per sheet)

Norpro Unbleached Baking Paper

$7.04 per package (approximately $0.16 per sheet)

Norpro Unbleached Baking Paper

We have no complaints about the performance of this paper, but we had to trim about 3 inches from its width to fit it in a standard rimmed baking sheet. We thought the sharp serrations on the box would guarantee a clean tear, but sheets often had uneven or jagged edges. The box was sturdy but lacked a closure and always stayed slightly ajar.

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Handling
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Performance
$7.04 per package (approximately $0.16 per sheet)

Wilton Parchment Paper

$12.98 per 2-box package (approximately $0.27 per sheet)

Wilton Parchment Paper

Once we got it into a baking sheet, this parchment performed well, but we had to trim off about 3 inches to make it fit. Even with the box's plastic serrated teeth, the paper routinely tore with a jagged chunk of extra paper at one end. That said, the paper remained fairly flat even when we got toward the end of the roll.

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Handling
Packaging
Performance
$12.98 per 2-box package (approximately $0.27 per sheet)

PaperChef Parchment Sheets 12” × 16”

$6.00 per package ($0.25 per sheet)

PaperChef Parchment Sheets 12” × 16”

These precut sheets come rolled inside a standard rectangular cardboard box. It's a clever idea, and each sheet was easy to remove; however, they were hard to flatten. Even when we pointed the curled sides down, the sheets sometimes sprung up and rerolled themselves. As a result, pouring cake batter and placing pizza dough atop the sheets was challenging.

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Handling
Packaging
Performance
$6.00 per package ($0.25 per sheet)
Not Recommended

Beyond Gourmet Unbleached Parchment Paper

$10.25 per package (approximately $0.21 per sheet)

Beyond Gourmet Unbleached Parchment Paper

Once you wrestle this paper into a baking sheet or onto the counter, your food will turn out fine. But it's not easy to use. The cardboard box is soft and lacks a cutting edge, and it became beat up and stretched out after just a few uses. Because it was difficult to tear the paper in a single, swift motion, the sheets often became wrinkled and had very uneven edges.

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Handling
Packaging
Performance
$10.25 per package (approximately $0.21 per sheet)

If You Care Unbleached Parchment Baking Paper

$7.99 per package (approximately $0.17 per sheet)

If You Care Unbleached Parchment Baking Paper

This paper worked well, but we can't say the same about the packaging. The flimsy cardboard box came unglued shortly after testing started. Even after we taped the box back together, the soft tearing edge was ineffective and produced jagged, uneven sheets. The sheets were often so wrinkled that we couldn't use them.

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Handling
Packaging
Performance
$7.99 per package (approximately $0.17 per sheet)