The Best Juicing Gear

We've rounded up everything you need to juice at home.

This week is all about juicing—from squeezing a few lemons with a citrus juicer to creating a whole juice bar with an electric fruit and vegetable juicer. Our winning manual citrus juicer is our go-to tool for juicing a tablespoon or two of lemon or lime juice. Electric citrus juicers are best if you want to make a big batch of lemonade, orange juice, or the best-ever homemade margaritas. Juicing at home saves money, allows more control over juice ingredients, and can be more convenient than buying premade juice—if you invest in the right juicer. Thankfully we’ve done the testing for you and gathered winners from each category.

—Carolyn Grillo, Senior Editor, ATK Reviews

This juicer was the most straightforward and enjoyable to use of the masticating juicers, with parts that fit together easily and a relatively fast auger that chewed through carrots, kale, and grapes with ease. As with all the masticating juicers, we had to cut our produce to match the size of its narrow feed tube, but its juice was smooth. It was relatively easy to clean, especially with its included cleaning brush.

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Our winning centrifugal juicer is straightforward to assemble, with parts that fit together well. It’s fast, powering through a pound of carrots in 34 seconds, and it produced smooth juice from carrots, kale, and grapes alike. It had trouble efficiently processing kale leaves, though when we applied a few tips, such as firmly packing the leaves or rolling them up, we had more success. It was among the easiest to clean out of the centrifugal juicers and contained debris fairly well, flinging it from the feed tube much less often than the other centrifugals.

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This blender-juicer hybrid claims to make juice and blend as well as appliances in either category. When used as a juicer, it quickly powered through denser fruits and vegetables to create smooth juice most of the time. As do most centrifugal juicers, it faltered a bit with leafy greens, but it was relatively easy to clean and assemble and remained steady on the counter. When used as a blender, it consistently blended smooth smoothies, ground almonds into almond butter, emulsified mayonnaise, and crushed ice for frozen drinks, holding its own against our favorite midpriced blender. We think avid juicers who would appreciate a well-performing blender and a smaller footprint for storage could find this combination appliance useful.

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Distinct from citrus presses that use small holes, this model features a star-like arrangement of large draining slots, which direct the juice in a steady stream with no splattering or overflowing. Its large, rounded handles were easy to squeeze for testers of all sizes, which helped this press quickly extract far more juice than any other model. Its roomy bowl could also accommodate up to medium-size oranges (but not large ones).

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This classic glass liquid measuring cup possessed all of the qualities that we liked in its smaller version; it was accurate and had bold, easy-to-read measurement lines that were clearly labeled. The glass resisted staining and was durable, and the handle stayed comfortably cool when we measured hot ingredients or microwaved the cup. Our one criticism: Using the cup properly required placing it on the counter, filling it, and then crouching to check the measurement at eye level, which some testers found awkward and uncomfortable.

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Our longtime inexpensive favorite remains a pleasure to use. With a sharp, gently curved blade, it effortlessly dispatched every task we set before it, mincing garlic precisely and breaking down chicken and dense butternut squash with authority. Its light weight and rounded spine made it easy to wield for long periods, and its textured plastic handle was comfortable to grip for hands of all sizes.

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This knife ran a very close race with our winner. It had a very sharp, gently curved blade that tackled every task well, and its rounded spine was easy to choke up on when we used a pinch grip. It’s a little heavier than our winner, but some testers actually preferred that extra weight, finding it “solid” and “authoritative” in their hands. And it’s just as inexpensive. One small quibble? The handle is made from a somewhat slick plastic that sometimes felt slippery when wet or greasy.

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This reversible plastic bar board was the largest we tested, allowing us to cut all manner of small foods with room to spare. It sat securely on the counter, thanks to its rubbery grips and moderate weight. And it was easy to clean in the dishwasher. A juice groove on one side of the board was great for containing small volumes of liquid. It’s not the prettiest board, but in a pinch, it could still be used to serve cheese or snacks.

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Made of teak, this bar board is naturally slightly oily, so it required less maintenance than the other wood or bamboo boards we tested, and it stained somewhat less extensively. It was big enough to accommodate all the foods we cut on it though still highly portable. And it’s reversible, with a juice groove on one side that helped contain messes when we cut a lemon into wedges. It was the heaviest bar board we tested, so it stayed put on the counter pretty well, though rubbery grips would have provided some extra security. Finally, it’s quite handsome, making a beautiful small platter for serving cheese or charcuterie.

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