Our Guide to Savory Baking

Move over, sweets—savory baking is here to stay.

Since I’m a professional baker, people assume that I love sweets, and I do, but I also love tasty, savory baked goods. So I’m thrilled that our newest cookbook celebrates just that. The Savory Baker contains 150 creative recipes for savory baked goods that can be made without much preparation or labor. You can use all the same gear you use for baking sweet desserts. Instead of using our top-rated round cake pan for baking a layer cake, try using it to make focaccia with caramelized red onion, pancetta, and oregano. Or use our favorite loaf pan to make zucchini bread with feta instead of banana bread. Our beloved rimmed baking sheet is perfect for baking flaky biscuits packed with fresh sage and oozing with melty Gruyère.

—Carolyn Grillo, Associate Editor, ATK Reviews

This folded metal pan produced tall, picture-perfect pound cake and sandwich bread with crisp corners. Like all folded pans, it lacked handles and had crevices in the corners that trapped food. We had to clean it very carefully. The corrugated pattern on the metal didn't affect the appearance of the baked goods. It still scratched slightly.

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With an ergonomic Santoprene rubber handle and a balanced, lightweight feel, this whisk was like an extension of a hand. It whipped cream and egg whites quickly, thanks to 10 wires that were thin enough to move through the liquid quickly but thick enough to push through heavy mixtures and blend pan sauces to smoothness.

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These precut parchment sheets, which come in a large plastic zipper-lock bag, are the only ones in our lineup that are stored completely flat. They're also sized just right to slide easily into a standard rimmed baking sheet, although we did have to use two overlapping sheets when rolling jelly roll cakes into coils. Their superior convenience made them the runaway favorite. Don't let the purchase price distract you: The per-sheet cost falls squarely in the middle of our lineup.

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This wheel did it all—it was comfortable to hold and allowed for a powerful grip. Its streamlined design didn’t trap food, and it still looked brand new after 10 rounds in the dishwasher. Its blade was sharp and visible for precise, straight cuts. The blade was tall, too, at 4 inches, so it rolled right over stacked toppings and towering crusts with ease.

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Our winning scraper’s versatile teardrop shape allowed us to choose between a more narrowly curved edge for smaller bowls and a broader edge for wider bowls. Its metal core kept it sufficiently rigid in our hands while handling dense cookie dough, and its flexible silicone edges left more delicate doughs intact as we handled them. This scraper was both easy to clean and durable. One tester found this scraper the slightest bit small, but it fit comfortably in most of our hands, and we liked how nimble it felt.

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This mixer aced nearly every test, with the exception of the high-hydration pizza dough, flawlessly completing everything from the most basic of tasks (such as whipping two egg whites) to making enough frosting for a three-layer cake. The speed controls and tilt-head lever were straightforward and simple to operate, and the bowl and attachments were easy to put on and take off. We do wish that the bowl had a handle and that the price (about $250) was a bit more relative to the mixer's size (the KitchenAid Classic Plus Series 4.5 Quart Tilt-Head Stand Mixer is about $230); however, if you want a smaller machine, this is a great option.

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