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Ingredients

The Surprising Versatility of Malted Milk Powder

This nutty treat is not just for chocolate malteds.

Probably no one sipping a malted milkshake or crunching on a chocolate-covered malt ball would suspect it, but the origins of the eponymous ingredient, malted milk powder, date back millenia. That’s when the first beer makers in the ancient Near East discovered that allowing cereal grains to sprout just a little—or malt—was not only essential before brewing them into beer, but also produced interesting new flavors.

What is Malted Milk Powder?

Fast forward to Chicago in the late 19th century, when James and William Horlick, two brothers who had emigrated from England, discovered how a liquid infusion of malted barley and wheat could be dried into a powder and made into a nutty-tasting drink when mixed with milk. They soon added dried dairy to the mix (prior to refrigeration and pasteurization, fresh milk could contain dangerous bacteria), and malted milk powder was was born. Initially marketed as a nutritional food (its sugars, converted from starches during the malting process, made it easy to digest), malted milk powder became beloved for its taste. By the middle of the 20th century, drugstore soda-fountain counters across the country were blending malted milk powder with ice cream to make nutty, caramelly-tasting milkshakes, and candies such as malt balls had become an American favorite.

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How to Use Malted Milk Powder

In addition to those soda-fountain treats, malted milk powder has become popular for lending a complex toasty flavor to pancakes, such as our Deluxe Blueberry Pancakes, and it can enhance a number of other treats with its roasty, caramelly notes as well. Below are a few of our favorite applications. Start off with about 1 tablespoon of the powder per serving, and then adjust to taste.

  • Stir into hot chocolate or a cup of coffee for subtle, deeper sweetness
  • Toss with popcorn to create compelling sweet/savory contrast
  • Stir into cream, and then make whipped cream to top ice cream sundaes or pies
  • Add to crème anglaise to accompany fruit desserts, cakes, or puddings

To experiment with adding malted milk powder to other foods, choose sweet recipes with simple flavors that allow milk powder’s malty flavor to shine through.

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JC
JOHN C.
16 days

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too. I've done this using a rimmed sheet pan instead of a skillet and put veggies and potatoes around the chicken for a one-pan meal. Broccoli gets nicely browned and yummy!

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too.

MD
MILES D.
JOHN C.
9 days

Amazed this recipe works out as well as it does. Would not have thought that the amount of time under the broiler would have produced a very juicy and favorable chicken with a very crispy crust. Used my 12" Lodge Cast Iron skillet (which can withstand 1000 degree temps to respond to those who wondered if it would work) and it turned out great. A "make again" as my family rates things. This is a great recipe, and I will definitely make it again. My butcher gladly butterflied the chicken for me, therefore I found it to be a fast and easy prep. I used my cast iron skillet- marvellous!

CM
CHARLES M.
11 days

John, wasn't it just amazing chicken? So much better than your typical oven baked chicken and on par if not better than gas or even charcoal grilled. It gets that smokey charcoal tasted and overnight koshering definitely helps, something I do when time permits. First-time I've pierced a whole chicken minus the times I make jerk chicken on the grill. Yup, the cast iron was not an issue.