Regular Olive Oil

Published July 1, 2005. From Cook's Illustrated.

"Regular" olive oil is produced by combining a chemically refined and very neutral olive oil with virgin or extra-virgin olive oil to boost its color, aroma, and flavor.

Overview:

Update: September 2013

DaVinci Olive Oil has become less widely distributed since this tasting was conducted, making it hard for many readers to find. In its place we are promoting the runner-up, Colavita, as our preferred regular olive oil. That said, we recently tested the flavor of olive oil when heated to 300 F, and found that there was no difference between olive oil and vegetable oil once it was heated. Even extra-virgin olive oil loses most of its flavor nuances once heated. Therefore, you can use olive oil if that is your preference, but we no longer specifically recommend using regular olive oil for cooking, since it is usually more expensive than vegetable oil.

___________________________________________________________

Extra-virgin olive oil is often called for in uncooked recipes, such as vinaigrettes, where its rich, assertive, fruity flavor can be fully appreciated. For cooking, however, “regular” olive oil, with its more restrained flavor and higher smoke point, is often the better choice. Olive oil is produced by… read more

Update: September 2013

DaVinci Olive Oil has become less widely distributed since this tasting was conducted, making it hard for many readers to find. In its place we are promoting the runner-up, Colavita, as our preferred regular olive oil. That said, we recently tested the flavor of olive oil when heated to 300 F, and found that there was no difference between olive oil and vegetable oil once it was heated. Even extra-virgin olive oil loses most of its flavor nuances once heated. Therefore, you can use olive oil if that is your preference, but we no longer specifically recommend using regular olive oil for cooking, since it is usually more expensive than vegetable oil.

___________________________________________________________

Extra-virgin olive oil is often called for in uncooked recipes, such as vinaigrettes, where its rich, assertive, fruity flavor can be fully appreciated. For cooking, however, “regular” olive oil, with its more restrained flavor and higher smoke point, is often the better choice. Olive oil is produced by combining a chemically refined and very neutral olive oil with virgin or extra-virgin olive oil to boost its color, aroma, and flavor. Olive oil contains only some of the fullness of flavor of extra-virgin olive oil. It is also less expensive.

We gathered seven different supermarket brands of olive oil in the test kitchen and held a blind tasting. Fifteen members of the America’s Test Kitchen staff tasted the oils straight from the bottle, with bread offered to cleanse palates.

Several of the oils were extremely bland or mild; they might as well have been vegetable oil. Our favorite tasted like olive oil, but it was significantly milder than our favorite supermarket extra-virgin olive oil.

less
In My Favorites
Please Wait…
Remove Favorite
Add to custom collection