Fruit Crisp

Published July 1, 1998.

Why this recipe works:

We tried everything from Grape-Nuts to cookie crumbs as a topping for our fruit crisp recipe, and found the ideal topping mixture to be chopped nuts and flour. Cutting the butter into the flour is crucial in creating a crisp topping, and we found that a food processor was ideally suited to… read more

We tried everything from Grape-Nuts to cookie crumbs as a topping for our fruit crisp recipe, and found the ideal topping mixture to be chopped nuts and flour. Cutting the butter into the flour is crucial in creating a crisp topping, and we found that a food processor was ideally suited to producing a mixture that resembles crumbly wet sand. We departed from traditional fruit crisp recipes by deciding against the use of a thickener for the fruit; letting the juices flow resulted in a much brighter, cleaner fruit taste. Only plums, which tend to be very juicy, needed a tablespoon of tapioca for thickening.

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Serves 6

To make a larger crisp that serves 10, double all the ingredients, use a 13 x 9-inch baking pan, and bake for 55 minutes at 375 degrees, without increasing the oven temperature. If making an apple crisp, we recommend equal quantities of Granny Smith and McIntosh apples. Peel, core, and cut apples and pears into one-inch chunks. Peel, pit, and cut nectarines, peaches, and plums into half-inch wedges. If using plums, add one tablespoon quick-cooking tapioca to the fruit mixture. Half a teaspoon of grated fresh ginger makes a nice flavor addition to all the fruits.

Ingredients

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