Blueberry Yeasted Waffles

Published July 1, 2007.

Why this recipe works:

A tiny bit of planning makes our raised waffle recipe easy to have ready in the morning. Mixing the ingredients and letting the batter stand overnight was convenient; refrigerating the batter helped control the growth of the yeast in our waffle recipe and produced waffles with superior flavor.… read more

A tiny bit of planning makes our raised waffle recipe easy to have ready in the morning. Mixing the ingredients and letting the batter stand overnight was convenient; refrigerating the batter helped control the growth of the yeast in our waffle recipe and produced waffles with superior flavor.

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Serves 2 to 4

The batter must be made 12 to 24 hours in advance. Low-fat or skim milk can be substituted for whole milk. We found that frozen wild blueberries—which are smaller—work best here. Larger blueberries release too much juice, which burns and becomes bitter when it comes in contact with the waffle iron. The frozen wild blueberry brands we prefer are Wyman’s, Cascadian Farms, and Whole Foods. We prefer the texture of the waffles made in a classic waffle iron, but a Belgian waffle iron will work, though it will make fewer waffles. The waffles are best served fresh from the iron but can be held in an oven until all of the batter is used. As you make the waffles, place them on a wire rack set above a baking sheet and place the baking sheet in a 200-degree oven. These waffles are quite rich, and you may not need to butter them before eating them. This recipe makes seven 7-inch round or four 9-inch square waffles.

Ingredients

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