Fresh Tomato Salsa

Published July 1, 2004.

Why this recipe works:

We set out to solve the problem of watery salsa with our salsa recipe, trying numerous techniques before stumbling upon one that worked: draining diced tomatoes (skin, seeds, and all) in a colander. Next, we fixed the spotlight on the supporting ingredients in a typical salsa recipe, choosing… read more

We set out to solve the problem of watery salsa with our salsa recipe, trying numerous techniques before stumbling upon one that worked: draining diced tomatoes (skin, seeds, and all) in a colander. Next, we fixed the spotlight on the supporting ingredients in a typical salsa recipe, choosing red onions over white, yellow, and sweet onions for their color and flavor; jalapeño chiles over serrano, habanero, and poblano chiles because of their wide availability, slight vegetal flavor, and moderate heat; and lime juice over red wine vinegar, rice vinegar, or lemon juice for its authentic flavor.

less

Makes about 3 cups

Heat varies from jalapeño to jalapeño, and because much of the heat resides in the seeds, we suggest mincing the seeds separately from the flesh, then adding minced seeds to taste. The amount of sugar and lime juice to use depends on the ripeness of the tomatoes. The salsa can be made 2 to 3 hours in advance, but hold off adding the salt, lime juice, and sugar until just before serving. The salsa is perfect for tortilla chips, but it's also a nice accompaniment to grilled steaks, chicken, and fish.

Ingredients

In My Favorites
Please Wait…
Remove Favorite
Add to custom collection