Baker's Edge

Published March 1, 2008. From Cook's Illustrated.

Could this simple redesign of a conventional baking pan really eliminate the problem of undercooked middles and burned edges when baking foods like brownies?

Overview:

This redesign of a conventional 9- by 13-inch baking pan features nothing more than three internal walls that extend across the pan. Could they really eliminate the problem of undercooked middles and burned edges when baking brownies, bar cookies, and even lasagna? When we tested this pan in our kitchen, we were pleased to discover that the answer is yes. The heavy-gauge cast aluminum pan evenly distributed heat while cooking, and because the Baker’s Edge has six more baking surfaces than ordinary pans, it gave each serving of our brownies at least two chewy edges (a great thing if you like edge pieces). And when we made lasagna, we discovered another advantage of the interior walls—they kept the layers from sliding apart, making for easy serving. The only disadvantage when making lasagna: You must cut the noodles to fit the pan.

This redesign of a conventional 9- by 13-inch baking pan features nothing more than three internal walls that extend across the pan. Could they really eliminate the problem of undercooked middles and burned edges when baking brownies, bar cookies, and even lasagna? When we tested this pan in our kitchen, we were pleased to discover that the answer is yes. The heavy-gauge cast aluminum pan evenly distributed heat while cooking, and because the Baker’s Edge has six more baking surfaces than ordinary pans, it gave each serving of our brownies at least two chewy edges (a great thing if you like edge pieces). And when we made lasagna, we discovered another advantage of the interior walls—they kept the layers from sliding apart, making for easy serving. The only disadvantage when making lasagna: You must cut the noodles to fit the pan.

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