Loaf Pans

Published January 1, 2007.

Loaf pans range in price from $4 to $75. Are the higher prices justified?

Overview:

Update June 2014:

The Baker's Secret Pan that we tested has been updated with a different gauge of metal (and a new model number). We will test the redesign soon and update this review with our findings.

___________________________________________________________


Seven years after our last testing, we wanted to see if anything new could best the bargain loaf pan we had previously chosen as a winner, (which is still available for $6 in supermarkets). Seven pound cakes, seven loaves of sandwich bread, and hours of baking later, we had a motley crew of baked goods and some new thoughts about loaf pans.

Size was one primary factor that made a difference. Bigger pans allowed the sandwich bread to bake up a bit fluffier than did smaller pans but yielded dense, square pound cakes. Narrower pans were the only correct choice for pound cake and fine for sandwich bread.

Our other primary concern was browning. Light-colored aluminum finishes yielded pale, anemic-looking baked goods. On the other hand, the dark nonstick surface on our… read more

Update June 2014:

The Baker's Secret Pan that we tested has been updated with a different gauge of metal (and a new model number). We will test the redesign soon and update this review with our findings.

___________________________________________________________


Seven years after our last testing, we wanted to see if anything new could best the bargain loaf pan we had previously chosen as a winner, (which is still available for $6 in supermarkets). Seven pound cakes, seven loaves of sandwich bread, and hours of baking later, we had a motley crew of baked goods and some new thoughts about loaf pans.

Size was one primary factor that made a difference. Bigger pans allowed the sandwich bread to bake up a bit fluffier than did smaller pans but yielded dense, square pound cakes. Narrower pans were the only correct choice for pound cake and fine for sandwich bread.

Our other primary concern was browning. Light-colored aluminum finishes yielded pale, anemic-looking baked goods. On the other hand, the dark nonstick surface on our previous winner actually browned the bread and pound cake a shade too much. Despite its wide availability and low price, it's no longer our top choice. Glass Pyrex browned nicely, but the real star of the show had a gold-colored nonstick surface that yielded baked goods with a perfectly even, honeyed-copper crust.

less
  • Product Tested

  • Prices are subject to change.
  • Highly Recommended - Winner

    Williams-Sonoma Goldtouch Nonstick Loaf Pan

    This pan yielded perfectly gold browning on both yeast breads and teacakes, and turned out a sandwich loaf that, as one test cook noted, "looked just like a bread should look."

    $21.00

  • Highly Recommended

    Pyrex Glass Loaf Pan

    A bargain for its performance, this glass dish fell just short of the Williams-Sonoma pan and was just a tad heavier.

    $6.95

  • Recommended with Reservations

    Anolon Suregrip Nonstick Loaf Pan

    Great heat-resistant handles and a large capacity for yeast bread didn’t make up for a squat, dense pound cake.

    $13.95

  • Not Recommended

    Doughmakers Loaf Pan

    Unfortunately, this pan’s main selling point—the company’s signature pebble-pattern finish that ensures easy release—was superfluous, since neither cake nor bread stuck to any of the pans. Plus the pale metal turned out pale baked goods.

    $14.95

In My Favorites
Please Wait…
Remove Favorite
Add to custom collection