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Roasted Bone-In Chicken Breasts

Published March 2016 Recipe Development

Why This Recipe Works

Bone-in chicken breasts roasted at a high temperature may have crispy, brown skin, but it often conceals dry, bland meat. A lower temperature keeps the meat juicy but leaves the skin pale and flabby. For the best of both worlds, we adapt a cooking technique that is more commonly used for steaks: reverse searing.

We start by applying salt under the skin to season the meat and help it retain moisture. Then we poke small holes in the skin to help drain excess fat. Gently baking the breasts at 325 degrees minimizes moisture loss and results in even cooking from the breasts’ thick ends to their thin ends. It also allows the surface of the skin to dry out so that a quick sear in a hot skillet is all that is required for a crackly, burnished finish. And since the cooking method is pretty much hands-off, there’s time to make a quick sauce to serve alongside.

Ingredients

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4 (10- to 12-ounce) bone-in chicken breasts, trimmed
1 ½ teaspoons kosher salt
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
Nutritional Information

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION

Per Serving (Serves 4)

  • Calories 460
  • Cholesterol 159 mg
  • Fat 26 g
  • Sodium 733 mg
  • Saturated 6 g
  • Carbs 0g
  • Trans 0 g
  • Dietary Fiber 0g
  • Monounsaturated 12 g
  • Sugar 0g
  • Polyunsaturated 5 g
  • Protein 52 g

The information shown is Edamam’s estimate based on available ingredients and preparation. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice.

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Instructions

Serves 4

Be sure to remove excess fatty skin from the thick ends of the breasts when trimming. You may serve these chicken breasts on their own or prepare our Jalapeño and Cilantro Sauce while the chicken roasts.

1. Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and heat oven to 325 degrees. Line rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil. Working with 1 breast at a time, use your fingers to carefully separate chicken skin from meat. Peel skin back, leaving it attached at top and bottom of breast and at ribs. Sprinkle salt evenly over all chicken, then lay skin back in place. Using metal skewer or tip of paring knife, poke 6 to 8 holes in fat deposits in skin. Arrange breasts skin side up on prepared sheet. Roast until chicken registers 160 degrees, 35 to 45 minutes.

2. Heat 12-inch skillet over low heat for 5 minutes. Add oil and swirl to coat surface. Add chicken, skin side down, and increase heat to medium-high. Cook chicken without moving it until skin is well browned and crispy, 3 to 5 minutes. Using tongs, flip chicken and prop against side of skillet so thick side of breast is facing down; continue to cook until browned, 1 to 2 minutes longer. Transfer to platter and let rest for 5 minutes before serving.

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JC
JOHN C.
16 days

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too. I've done this using a rimmed sheet pan instead of a skillet and put veggies and potatoes around the chicken for a one-pan meal. Broccoli gets nicely browned and yummy!

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too.

MD
MILES D.
JOHN C.
9 days

Amazed this recipe works out as well as it does. Would not have thought that the amount of time under the broiler would have produced a very juicy and favorable chicken with a very crispy crust. Used my 12" Lodge Cast Iron skillet (which can withstand 1000 degree temps to respond to those who wondered if it would work) and it turned out great. A "make again" as my family rates things. This is a great recipe, and I will definitely make it again. My butcher gladly butterflied the chicken for me, therefore I found it to be a fast and easy prep. I used my cast iron skillet- marvellous!

CM
CHARLES M.
11 days

John, wasn't it just amazing chicken? So much better than your typical oven baked chicken and on par if not better than gas or even charcoal grilled. It gets that smokey charcoal tasted and overnight koshering definitely helps, something I do when time permits. First-time I've pierced a whole chicken minus the times I make jerk chicken on the grill. Yup, the cast iron was not an issue.