Cooking Greens

We’ve blanched, steamed, stir-fried, and sautéed enough greens over the years to know that some taste best cooked quickly over a high flame, while others benefit from slow, gentle heat.

To pair the right leaf with the right cooking method, follow our thoroughly tested guidelines.

| GREEN | TEXTURE | COOKING METHOD | | --- | --- | --- | | Beet Greens | Medium-Tender | S | | Bok Choy | Crisp, High Moisture | SF | | Collards | Sturdy | SB, PS | | Green Cabbage | Crip, High Moisture | QB | | Kale | Sturdy | SB, PS | | Mustard Greens | Sturdy | SB, PS | | Napa Cabbage | Crisp, High Moisture | SF | | Red Cabbage | Crispy, High Moisture | QB | | Savoy Cabbage | Crisp, High Moisture | QB, SF | | Spinach (mature) | Medium-Tender | S | | Swiss Chard | Medium-Tender | S | | Turnip Greens | Sturdy | SB, PS |

Key: PS=Pan Steam; QB=Quick Braise; S=Sauté; SB=Slow Braise; SF=Stir-Fry

Collard greens and kale have tough, thick stems that must be trimmed before they can be used in recipes. Hold each leaf at the base of the stem over a large bowl filled with water. With a chef's knife, slash the leafy portion from each side of the stem. Discard the stem.

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