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A Good Egg

By Cook's Illustrated Published January 2009

The latest from the henhouse are eggs with a high level of omega-3 fatty acids. This unsaturated fat is said to reduce blood pressure and the risk of coronary disease as well as relieve stress and depression. That’s all well and good, but how do the eggs taste?

Here’s the latest from the henhouse: eggs with a high level of omega-3 fatty acids. This unsaturated fat, also found in fish oil, is said to reduce blood pressure and the risk of coronary disease as well as relieve stress and depression. That’s all well and good, but how do the eggs taste? We set up a blind tasting of eggs containing levels of omega-3 from around 50 mg per egg (the standard amount in ordinary supermarket eggs) up to 310 mg per egg. Our finding: The more omega-3’s, the richer the egg flavor and the deeper the yolk color. Why? Commercially raised chickens usually peck on corn and soy, while chickens on the omega-3-enriched diet have supplements of greens, flax seed, and algae, which also add flavor, complexity, and color.

When shopping for a good egg, buyer beware: Brands may claim a high level of omega-3’s, but the fine print sometimes reveals that the number refers to the level present in two eggs, not one. Look for brands that guarantee at least 200 mg per egg.

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A good dose of omega-3’s is 200 mg per egg.