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Dutch Ovens

Published December 2016 Behind the Testing

How we tested

A Dutch oven just might be the most important—and versatile—cooking vessel you can own. Dutch ovens can go on the stove and in the oven, making them ideal for braising meat; cooking soups, stews, and sauces; boiling water; frying; and even baking bread.

These pots come in all shapes, sizes, and materials; over years of testing and using them every day in the test kitchen, we’ve come up with some preferences. We like round Dutch ovens (oval ones hang off of burners) that hold a minimum of 6 quarts. And we like heavy pots made of enameled cast iron, which conducts and retains heat well and is easy to clean and maintain.

At the center of the Dutch oven universe is a pot we love that meets all of our criteria and looks good doing it: the Le Creuset 7 1/4 Round Dutch Oven. This beautiful pot performs magnificently and, with proper care, should last a lifetime—but it costs a whopping $359.99. And lately, we’ve seen some newer cheaper options on the market. So we decided to see if the Le Creuset was still worth its price and to see if we could find a great Dutch oven for less money, setting a price cap of around $125.00 (about one-third of the price of the Le Creuset) for a new testing of these workhorse pots. We chose seven challengers, priced from $24.29 to $121.94, to pit against the Le Creuset, using each pot to boil water, cook rice, fry French fries, braise beef, and bake bread. To test for durability, we washed each pot repeatedly with an abrasive sponge, whacked their rims with metal spoons, and repeatedly slammed their lids onto their bases.

Did any of these cheaper pots make the grade? After weeks of rigorous testing, it became clear that all of the pots can cook food acceptably, but some make it much easier to do so. And while the Le Creuset is still in its own class, we did find some great alternatives.

What mattered? First, material. We included two light aluminum pots in our lineup because one of the most common complaints we hear about enameled cast-iron Dutch ovens is how heavy they are. But cooking with these two light pots only reinforced our preference for cast-iron cores, as the aluminum pots were prone to scorching and dented easily.

For pots this hefty, we found that handles were another critical factor: Big, comfortable ones were a must, and pots with skimpy handles were downgraded accordingly. The interior color of the pots mattered, too. All of the cast-iron pots, save one, had a light interior that made it easy to monitor browning. The outlier had a dark nonstick finish that made it easy to clean but hard to see how the food was browning. Our testing also bore out a preference for pots with shorter sides, as tall sides made it more awkward to add food to hot oil in a safe, splash-free manner when frying.

But what really made some pots easier to use was their shape. Broad bases with straight sides were best. Two pots had rounded sides that curved in at the base, reducing some of their potential flat usable cooking surface. Larger cooking surfaces fit more food, so we could brown beef for stew in two batches versus three or four, a savings of up to 15 minutes. Aside from the time savings, prolonged browning can mean that the fond (the flavorful brown bits that form on the bottom on the pot) is more likely to burn, which can render your dinner inedible.

In the end, we still feel that the Le Creuset is a worthwhile investment. But we’re excited to have found a good alternative. The Cuisinart 7 Qt. Round Covered Casserole performed like a champ in all of our cooking tests, and it costs just $121.94. It has the same advantageous shape and features as the Le Creuset—broad with straight, low sides; big comfortable handles; and a core made of cast iron. The trade-off? It’s 3 pounds heavier than the Le Creuset (which is a hefty 13+ pounds when empty), and it chipped cosmetically along its rim during our abuse testing. But for a third of the price, it’s an excellent alternative that we highly recommend.

Methodology

We tested seven inexpensive ($125 and under) Dutch ovens against our winning Dutch oven, the Le Creuset 7 1/4 Round Dutch Oven, using each to boil, cook, fry, bake, and braise. We rated them on the food they produced as well as their durability and how easy they were to use and clean. We purchased all models online and have listed the price we paid; they appear below in order of preference.

COOKING: We rated each pot on the food it made; pots that produced perfectly cooked food within recipe time ranges rated highest.

CAPACITY: We looked at how much food the pots could fit; those with wider cooking surfaces allowed us to cook food in fewer batches.

EASE OF USE: Broad, relatively medium-weight pots with comfortable handles and lower sides rated highest.

DURABILITY: Pots that remained functionally and cosmetically intact rated highest.

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The Results

Winner
Highly Recommended

Le Creuset 7 1/4 Quart Round Dutch Oven

This pricey pot is still the one to beat. It was the most durable and user-friendly with comfortable handles and lower, straight sides that made it easy to move, load, and unload. Its broad, lightly-colored cooking surface allowed us to cook more food faster and monitor browning. It’s heavy, as a Dutch oven should be, but a bit lighter than some of the others we tested.

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Ease of Use
$359.99*
Best Buy
Highly Recommended

Cuisinart 7 Qt. Round Covered Casserole

This model costs a third of what our favorite Le Creuset Dutch oven does and performed almost as well. With a very similar design—low, straight sides and a broad, off-white cooking surface—it allowed us to easily move food, sear in fewer batches, and monitor browning. The trade-offs: The Cuisinart pot is 3 pounds heavier and has slightly smaller handles than the Le Creuset pot, and its rim chipped during abuse testing.

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Ease of Use
$121.94*
Recommended

Cooking with Calphalon Enamel Cast Iron Red 7-Qt. Dutch Oven with Cover

This pot had comfortable handles and thanks to straight sides and a wide base, a generous cooking surface. Its interior was black, which made it slightly harder to monitor browning, and because dark colors conduct heat faster, it tended to cook faster, too (its bread was a bit dark on the bottom, though still acceptable). It also chipped very slightly during abuse testing.

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$111.30*

Lodge Enamel 7.5 Quart Dutch Oven

This pot cooked food well. It had nice low sides, which made it easy to move food in and out of it without getting splattered. It also had comfortable handles and an off-white interior, so it was easy to monitor browning. But it was the heaviest in the lineup and had rounded sides that curved in at the base, which ate into its usable cooking surface and made it quite small for such a large pot.

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$84.99*
Recommended with Reservations

Tramontina 6.5 Qt Round Cast Iron

The pot turned out quality food. It had a light interior, and comfortable handles. But its shape was slightly more challenging to use. Its sides were quite tall so we had to add food at a more extreme angle, which caused splatter; it also had a narrower mouth, making it hard to get our hands out of the way. Thanks to a narrow base, its cooking surface was smaller, too, so we had to sear beef in two extra batches.

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$69.96*

Lodge Enamel 6 Quart Dutch Oven

This pot had nice handles, low sides for accessibility, and a light interior to track browning. But it had rounded sides that curved in at the base, robbing the pot of some of its flat cooking surface; this meant we had to sear beef in four batches instead of two, which took an extra 15 minutes.

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$60.99*

Imusa Cast Aluminum Caldero Dutch Oven with Natural Finish

This pot stained and dented, its knob became loose (we fixed it), its handles were small, and it ran a bit hot. That said, it made good food and has some major selling points. It’s ridiculously cheap, extremely lightweight, has a great shape (low sides and a broad cooking surface), and has a light interior to monitor browning. If weight or money is what’s keeping you from a Dutch oven, this is a workable option: Just be prepared to replace it.

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$24.29*
Not Recommended

Nordic Ware 6.5 Quart ProCast Traditions Dutch Oven

This pot was tall, narrow, and hard to get food in and out of. Its interior was dark, so it was hard to monitor browning. Its narrow base limited how much beef we could sear and a ridge around its rim made it hard to clip on a thermometer, something we often use with Dutch ovens while frying. Lastly, it’s made of soft aluminum and dented readily during abuse testing.

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$60.00*
Done in 281 ms! 61.385 KiB - 7.5% = 56.776 KiB