Make Dumplings and Potstickers at Home

This week, I’m filling up my freezer with homemade potstickers and dumplings.

I’ve been doing lots of baking and cooking projects that I don’t normally make time for, such as Sourdough Bread and Masala Chai Concentrate. This week, I’m switching gears and filling up my freezer with homemade potstickers and dumplings. These recipes might seem daunting if you’ve never made them, but our instructions are clear and easy to follow. All you need is a few simple tools. Our top‑rated measuring spoons ensure that each wrapper is packed with the same amount of filling. And our favorite rasp‑style grater is ideal for fine‑grating garlic and ginger. Challenging myself with new recipes has been a delicious and satisfying adventure. I hope you add dumplings or potstickers to your weekly cooking list, too. —Carolyn Grillo, Associate Editor, Reviews

Our old favorite fits a good amount of food, and we love its new telescoping handle: When the handle is extended to the full 4 inches, it's easy to grip to move the steamer in and out of the pot. The handle can also collapse to 2.5 inches when the steamer is in the pot or for compact storage. Our only quibbles? The metal leaves are a bit finicky to clean and bent a little during testing, though the unit remained perfectly functional throughout.

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The cooking surface was slick, both when new and after extensive use, and food never stuck. It’s one of the lightest models we tested, so it was easy to lift and maneuver, but it was also sturdy and resisted denting. All of our testers liked its wide, comfortable handle. Like every other model, its surface became scratched when we used a knife as if to cut a frittata, but it otherwise held up well.

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If you grate ginger frequently, this is by far the best tool we've found for the job: It's speedy, easy to handle, and superefficient. With ample surface area and razor-sharp etched holes, this tool—made by the same company as our favorite box and rasp-style graters—was the least wasteful in our lineup. It also tied for fastest, making 1 tablespoon of puree in just 15 seconds. Its handle was comfortable to grip, and its wide paddle shape made it especially easy to collect ginger puree and to clean.

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With a large area of sharp etched holes, our favorite rasp-style grater got the job of grating ginger done—just somewhat more slowly and a touch more wastefully than our top models. Its long, narrow shape was less ideal for handling bigger pieces of ginger and forced us to aim more carefully when grating. It was also harder to clean, since its curved edges trapped pockets of puree underneath.

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Our winning spoons had a simple design that allowed for a continuous, bump-free sweep, with a ball-chain connector (similar to what military dog tags hang on) that was easy to open and close. This set's metal construction felt remarkably sturdy, and ingredients didn't cling to the stainless steel. And while the 1-tablespoon measure did not fit into all spice jars, it was a minor inconvenience for an otherwise easy-to-use set.

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This inexpensive model produced perfectly tender-chewy white, brown, and sushi rice, and it came with useful features like a digital timer that lets the cook know when the rice is nearly ready, clear audio alert, and a delayed-start function. Although it makes up to 8 cups of cooked rice, it takes up only a small amount of counter space and can be easily tucked away. The inner lid pops out for hassle-free cleanup.  Update October 2018: This model is now called the Aroma 8-Cup Digital Rice Cooker, Multicooker and Food Steamer and has a “flash rice” function that cuts down on the time required to cook white rice. When we tested this feature, the cooking time decreased by about 30 percent and the quality of the rice didn’t suffer. In all tests, it performed as well as or better than the original model.

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The shorter version of our favorite 12-inch tongs, this model easily picked up foods of all shapes and sizes—from dainty blueberries to a hefty jar of salsa—and was extremely comfortable to operate. The uncoated, scalloped stainless-steel tips allowed us a precise grip, making it especially easy to lift and arrange thinly sliced fruit, and the tongs' locking mechanism was smooth and intuitive.

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Our longtime winner excelled, with uniform, steady heating and good visibility inside the saucepan to monitor browning. Its cup-shaped stay-cool handle was easy to grip, and a helper handle provided another grabbing point when the pan was full. Even after brutal whacking on concrete, this model emerged with only tiny dents inside and one slight dent on the bottom, and it still sat flat on the counter.

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This brush had the thickest head of bristles in the testing, allowing it to pick up and deposit the greatest volume of egg wash, oil, butter, or glaze in a single pass. And because the bristles weren't too densely packed, they still felt agile and precise. At a uniform 1.8 inches, they were the ideal length for most tasks (though some testers preferred brushes with slightly longer bristles for getting into the nooks and crannies on fruit tarts). While not as grippy as some, its medium-length, relatively fat, varnished wood handle was still comfortable to hold. Additionally, it lost the fewest bristles during testing.

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