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Why You Should Buy Kale in Bunches, Not Bags

By Annie Petito Published

We found buying bunches saves both time and money.

At the grocery store, you generally have two options when it comes to buying kale: Buying the leaves in bunches, or pre-cut in bags. Buying prepped kale might seem like the convenient choice, but when we took a deep dive into the bag, we found that the costs outweigh the benefits.

In the bags of kale we inspected, we found that the pieces were irregularly sized, ranging from large, 2-inch pieces to some that measured to less than an inch. These latter pieces pose an issue when cooking: Pieces that small wilt to almost nothing.

We also discovered that the bags contained more than half their weight in inedible stem pieces, which needed to be sorted out and replaced. What’s more, some usable leaves had been cut crosswise, which left the stem intact and contributed an unpleasant woodiness to finished dishes.

All this to say, prepping your own leafy bunches is your best bet. When shopping, look for full bunches with greens running the entire length of the stem, so you can maximize the usable leafy portion.

Recipe Roasted Kale with Parmesan, Shallot, and Nutmeg

Just 10 minutes in the oven unlocks a variety of vivid textures in the brassica.

Recipe Pan-Steamed Kale with Chorizo

Steam is all you need to bring out the best in this brassica. 

Recipe Swiss Chard and Kale Gratin

For a new holiday side, we gussy up greens with a touch of cream and a crisp topping.

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JC
JOHN C.
16 days

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too. I've done this using a rimmed sheet pan instead of a skillet and put veggies and potatoes around the chicken for a one-pan meal. Broccoli gets nicely browned and yummy!

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too.

MD
MILES D.
JOHN C.
9 days

Amazed this recipe works out as well as it does. Would not have thought that the amount of time under the broiler would have produced a very juicy and favorable chicken with a very crispy crust. Used my 12" Lodge Cast Iron skillet (which can withstand 1000 degree temps to respond to those who wondered if it would work) and it turned out great. A "make again" as my family rates things. This is a great recipe, and I will definitely make it again. My butcher gladly butterflied the chicken for me, therefore I found it to be a fast and easy prep. I used my cast iron skillet- marvellous!

CM
CHARLES M.
11 days

John, wasn't it just amazing chicken? So much better than your typical oven baked chicken and on par if not better than gas or even charcoal grilled. It gets that smokey charcoal tasted and overnight koshering definitely helps, something I do when time permits. First-time I've pierced a whole chicken minus the times I make jerk chicken on the grill. Yup, the cast iron was not an issue.