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How to Reheat Prime Rib without Overcooking It

By Keith Dresser Published

Our two-step method means leftovers are just as perfect the next day.

There’s a reason prime rib has never gone out of fashion as a holiday centerpiece: It’s a majestic roast that signals special occasion. In our recipe for Best Prime Rib, we cook the roast to perfection by first salting it for a day and up to four; roasting it at a very low temperature for 3 to 4 hours; then cutting the heat and leaving it in the oven until it reaches 120 degrees (for rare) or about 125 degrees (for medium-rare); and finally broiling it to brown the top.  The result is an exquisitely tender, juicy,  rich-tasting roast with a bronzed, substantial crust.

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If you’re lucky enough to have leftovers, we’ve also got a way to reheat them so the meat tastes as succulent as it did when you first took the roast out of the oven. The key is to reheat it just as it was cooked: low and slow, so it can fully warm without its exterior drying out or its temperature rising beyond the original target for doneness. We also have a recommendation for recrisping the crust.

Here's what to do:

  1. Place roast on wire rack set in rimmed baking sheet. This will allow air to circulate under the meat for more even heating.
  2. Heat roast in a 250-degree oven on the middle rack until meat registers 120 degrees (1 to 1½ hours). Pat surface of roast dry with paper towels.
  3. Sear roast on all sides in hot, oiled skillet, 1 to 1½ minutes per side. (Do not sear cut ends.)

Recipe Best Prime Rib

Top chefs say 18 hours in a 120-degree oven is the route to prime rib perfection. What if we told you it was possible in almost one-third the time?

Recipe Classic Horseradish Cream Sauce

The classic accompaniment to prime rib.

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For a crisp, dense, velvety roasted potato, take low-starch potatoes, cover for part of the cooking time, and flip them once.

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JC
JOHN C.
16 days

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too. I've done this using a rimmed sheet pan instead of a skillet and put veggies and potatoes around the chicken for a one-pan meal. Broccoli gets nicely browned and yummy!

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too.

MD
MILES D.
JOHN C.
9 days

Amazed this recipe works out as well as it does. Would not have thought that the amount of time under the broiler would have produced a very juicy and favorable chicken with a very crispy crust. Used my 12" Lodge Cast Iron skillet (which can withstand 1000 degree temps to respond to those who wondered if it would work) and it turned out great. A "make again" as my family rates things. This is a great recipe, and I will definitely make it again. My butcher gladly butterflied the chicken for me, therefore I found it to be a fast and easy prep. I used my cast iron skillet- marvellous!

CM
CHARLES M.
11 days

John, wasn't it just amazing chicken? So much better than your typical oven baked chicken and on par if not better than gas or even charcoal grilled. It gets that smokey charcoal tasted and overnight koshering definitely helps, something I do when time permits. First-time I've pierced a whole chicken minus the times I make jerk chicken on the grill. Yup, the cast iron was not an issue.