Skip to main content

6 Genius Tips for Cleaning Kitchen Tools

By Keith Dresser Published

If you’re spending as much time cleaning your kitchen equipment as you are cooking with it, it’s time for some better methods.

Wrestling ginger fibers out of your rasp grater when you need it to zest lemons isn't just annoying—it can set dinner back. Or what finding that your pastry brush is still greasy from melted butter just when you need it to paint egg wash over pie crust?

We’ve got solutions to easily removing stubborn messes and odors from core kitchen gear, so they’re clean and pristine when you need them. 

Rasp Grater

Wash ASAP

Immediately after use, rinse the blade under warm water and then run a wet sponge along the grating surface, moving toward the handle (moving away from the handle will cause bits of sponge to get caught in the teeth). If food dries out and bonds itself to the grating surface, soak the grater before proceeding.

→Buy our winning rasp grater. 

Pastry/Basting Brushes

Salt Bath

After washing the dirty brushes, rinsing them well, and shaking them dry, place the brushes, with the bristles pointing down, into a cup and fill the cup with coarse salt until the bristles are covered. The salt draws moisture out of the bristles and keeps them dry and fresh between uses.

→Buy our winning pastry/basting brush.

Wooden Spoons

Scrub with baking soda paste

Alkaline baking soda neutralizes odor-causing acids, and since it is water-soluble, it is drawn into the wood along with the moisture in the paste. For every tablespoon of baking soda, use 1 teaspoon of water.

→Buy our winning wooden spoon.

Wire Cooling Racks

Soak in baking sheet 

Most sinks aren’t large enough to hold a rack when flat, so we soak it in a rimmed baking sheet. Squirt dish soap into the sheet and fill it with warm water. Invert the rack in the sheet and soak until all food particles are loosened. Scrub the rack gently in the direction in which the wires run, widthwise on top and lengthwise on underside.

→Buy our winning wire rack and our winning rimmed baking sheet.

 

Box Grater

Grate stale bread

Stale bread is hard enough to remove stuck-on food and dry enough that it won’t leave behind any sticky residue of its own. Grate the bread over a plate to catch the crumbs.

→Buy our winning box grater. 

 

Wooden Salad Bowls

Warm in low oven or sand and oil

Method 1: To remove sticky buildup, adjust oven rack to middle position and heat oven to 275 degrees. Line rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil or parchment paper and set wire rack in sheet. Place bowl upside down on rack. Turn off oven (don't forget this step or bowl might burn) and place sheet in oven. Within minutes, oils will start to bead on surface of bowl. After 1 to 2 hours, oils will run off bowl and onto sheet. Once bowl appears dry, remove sheet from oven and wipe down bowl with paper towels to remove any residue. (If bowl is still sticky, repeat baking process.)

Method 2: “Refinish” the wood by rubbing the surface with sandpaper and coating it with mineral oil.

Put your newly pristine tools to work in these recipes:

Recipe Beets with Orange and Walnuts

Our simple method saves time, intensifies flavor, and even yields a beet-enriched sauce.

Recipe American-Style Soda Bread with Raisins and Caraway

For bread with a moist, flavorful crumb and a crisp, tender crust, use both cake flour and all-purpose flour and go light on the buttermilk.

Recipe Carrot Layer Cake

This American classic has a lot going for it: moist cake, delicate spice, tangy cream cheese frosting. If only it were handsome enough to serve to company, too.

Leave a comment and join the conversation!

0 Comments
Read & post comments with a free account
Join the conversation with our community of home cooks, test cooks, and editors.
First Name is Required
Last Name is Required
Email Address is Required
How we use your email?
Password is Required
JC
JOHN C.
16 days

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too. I've done this using a rimmed sheet pan instead of a skillet and put veggies and potatoes around the chicken for a one-pan meal. Broccoli gets nicely browned and yummy!

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too.

MD
MILES D.
JOHN C.
9 days

Amazed this recipe works out as well as it does. Would not have thought that the amount of time under the broiler would have produced a very juicy and favorable chicken with a very crispy crust. Used my 12" Lodge Cast Iron skillet (which can withstand 1000 degree temps to respond to those who wondered if it would work) and it turned out great. A "make again" as my family rates things. This is a great recipe, and I will definitely make it again. My butcher gladly butterflied the chicken for me, therefore I found it to be a fast and easy prep. I used my cast iron skillet- marvellous!

CM
CHARLES M.
11 days

John, wasn't it just amazing chicken? So much better than your typical oven baked chicken and on par if not better than gas or even charcoal grilled. It gets that smokey charcoal tasted and overnight koshering definitely helps, something I do when time permits. First-time I've pierced a whole chicken minus the times I make jerk chicken on the grill. Yup, the cast iron was not an issue.