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How to Cut Carrots

By Keith Dresser Published

Evenly-sized cuts are the key to success. Here are our favorite methods for cutting carrots.

The long, conical shape and dense texture of carrots make them a challenge to cut uniformly. Here’s how to slice, dice, and julienne them into same-size pieces that look attractive and cook at the same rate.

Tip: Get a Grip

We employ the “pinch grip” for the cuts below. This means pinching the blade with your thumb and forefinger where it meets the handle, which gives you the most control and leverage over the whole length of the knife.

HOW TO DICE

1. Make Manageable-Size Pieces

Peel carrots and trim tops and ends, then cut each into 2- to 3-inch lengths.

2. Create Flat Side

With blade parallel to carrot, rest front of blade on end of carrot farthest away from you. Hold carrot with claw grip and apply downward pressure while moving blade forward to cut plank. Plank thickness will depend on desired size of dice (1⁄4 inch thick for 1⁄4-inch dice, 1⁄2 inch thick for 1⁄2-inch dice, etc.).

3. Cut Planks

Lay piece on newly created flat side and slice more planks of equal thickness. As you cut, keep tip of knife blade in contact with cutting board using rocking motion: As heel of knife goes down, blade slices forward; then, blade slides back as heel is lifted up.

4. Stack

Stack several planks (including original plank sliced to create flat side). Using same cutting motion as above, cut sticks equal in thickness to planks.

5. Turn and Chop

Neatly bundle some sticks together, turn 90 degrees, and cut crosswise to complete size of dice desired.

Create flat side
Cut planks
Stack
Turn and chop

Tip: The Modified "Claw"

To prevent stacked planks from slipping, use middle and index fingers to guide knife blade, and press pinkie and thumb against either end of stack.

HOW TO JULIENNE

Follow steps 1 through 4 above, cutting carrots into lengths, then 1⁄8-inch-thick planks, and finally 1⁄8-inch-thick sticks, or julienne.

HOW TO SLICE

Basic Slice

Hold whole carrot with claw grip and hold knife perpendicular to carrot. With tip of blade on cutting board and middle of blade on carrot, make even slices of desired thickness by pushing blade down and forward through carrot.

Bias Cut

A bias cut creates extra surface area for browning and allows you to create uniform pieces. Use same motions as for slicing, but position knife at 45-degree angle relative to carrot. Change angle to vary length and surface area of slices; sharper angles create more elongated slices.

Basic slice
Bias cut

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JC
JOHN C.
16 days

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too. I've done this using a rimmed sheet pan instead of a skillet and put veggies and potatoes around the chicken for a one-pan meal. Broccoli gets nicely browned and yummy!

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too.

MD
MILES D.
JOHN C.
9 days

Amazed this recipe works out as well as it does. Would not have thought that the amount of time under the broiler would have produced a very juicy and favorable chicken with a very crispy crust. Used my 12" Lodge Cast Iron skillet (which can withstand 1000 degree temps to respond to those who wondered if it would work) and it turned out great. A "make again" as my family rates things. This is a great recipe, and I will definitely make it again. My butcher gladly butterflied the chicken for me, therefore I found it to be a fast and easy prep. I used my cast iron skillet- marvellous!

CM
CHARLES M.
11 days

John, wasn't it just amazing chicken? So much better than your typical oven baked chicken and on par if not better than gas or even charcoal grilled. It gets that smokey charcoal tasted and overnight koshering definitely helps, something I do when time permits. First-time I've pierced a whole chicken minus the times I make jerk chicken on the grill. Yup, the cast iron was not an issue.