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Is an Electric Pasta Machine the Key to Perfect Pasta at Home?

By Riddley Gemperlein-Schirm Published

We tested three electric pasta machines to see which one could make the best spaghetti, fettuccine, penne, and more.

Our favorite manual pasta maker, the Marcato Atlas 150 Wellness Pasta Machine, flawlessly rolls and cuts dough for perfect homemade fettuccine, sheets of lasagna, and angel hair pasta. But the Marcato and manual makers like it can’t produce extruded pasta such as spaghetti or tubular shapes such as macaroni and penne. Enter electric pasta makers, which promise not only to make these extruded pasta shapes but also to mix and knead the dough for you. Some even have built-in scales to weigh ingredients as you add them, so you don’t have to use a separate kitchen scale. But how well do these machines actually make pasta—and how easy are they to use and clean? 

To find out, we tested three machines, priced from about $125 to about $250, and used them to make spaghetti, fettuccine, sheets of lasagna, and penne. For these tests, we followed the recipes provided in each of the machines’ instruction manuals. We also made two types of spaghetti—using our Master Recipe for Pasta Dough and gluten-free fresh pasta dough—with each of the models.

slightly curved pasta lying on a table

Unlike manual models, electric pasta makers are able to make extruded pasta shapes such as penne and spaghetti. They also promise to mix and knead the dough for you.

How Easy Were the Machines to Use?

The three machines in our lineup were similarly designed. Each featured a mixing paddle centered inside a chamber topped with a transparent plastic perforated lid. Shaping disks were positioned in a holder at the front of each machine. To make pasta, we added the flour to the mixing chamber, closed the lid, turned on the machine, and slowly added the liquid ingredients (egg and water) through the perforated lid. Once the dough was mixed, the paddle reversed direction and slowly pushed the dough through the shaping disk. We then cut the pasta strands as the machine extruded the dough.

One of the machines was easier to use than the others. It had the simplest control panel, with limited options: start/stop, mix, and extrude. The control panels of the other two machines were less intuitive and more jumbled, with lots of buttons and settings.

Gif of Philips machine extruding pasta
We liked the flat-edged cutting tool that came with one model, which tidily severed the pasta as it was extruded; we had to use scissors with the other two machines, which was more cumbersome.

Our favorite machine came with an extremely useful flat-edged tool for cutting the pasta as it was extruded through the shaping disk—we had to use kitchen shears for this task with the other two models. We also liked that this machine mixed the dough for just 3 minutes before extruding it (the slowest machine took about 5 minutes) and that its shaping disks were positioned vertically, so the extruding pasta was easy to see and cut. The disks of one machine faced downward toward the counter, making it hard to see the pasta as it came out.

hand holding curved and curly shaped pasta
Penne perfection was elusive: One machine didn't include a penne disk, and another made rough-looking penne that was corrugated and curved. The third model was successful, churning out crisp, neat tubes.

Can You Use Any Pasta Dough Recipe in These Machines?

When we tried to make spaghetti using our Master Recipe for Pasta Dough and our recipe for gluten-free fresh pasta dough, all the machines struggled. Because these recipes weren’t designed with an electric pasta machine in mind, they were far too wet. After examining each machine’s pasta recipe booklets, we noticed that all their pasta dough recipes called for fewer eggs, producing dough that was dry and crumbly. There was a good reason for this: The dough needed to be looser in order for the mixing paddle to push it through the shaping disk. When we followed the machines’ recipes, we had success—and our favorite model was able to produce excellent spaghetti, fettuccine, penne, and sheets of lasagna. However, the other two models struggled at times, even with their own recipes. The edges of their fettuccine were ragged, their sheets of lasagna were narrow and torn in parts, and one made curved penne that looked more like macaroni (the other didn't include a penne shaping disk at all). What’s more, one of the machines left a significant amount of unextruded dough in the mixing chamber—even after it automatically stopped, indicating that the extrusion was done.

Our takeaway? It’s best to use the recipes that come with and are designed for the machines. Our favorite model includes an entire recipe booklet, with instructions for regular, gluten-free, and even vegetable-dyed doughs.

pretty shot of spaghetti nests made from the winner.

We found that it was best to use the recipes that came with the machines. When we did so, our favorite model produced gorgeous spaghetti.

How Easy Were the Machines to Clean?

To put it bluntly, none of the machines was easy to clean. This is because you have to disassemble the machine and wash each part separately. Our favorite electric pasta maker, for example, requires you to remove the front panel, then the shaping disk, then the disk holder, then the mixing paddle, then the mixing chamber. All the models also came with cleaning tools that had needle-like pointed ends to help you remove dough from the nooks and crannies of the shaping disks. And, of course, you must reassemble everything afterward. 

The Best Electric Pasta Machine: Philips Pasta Maker

Our favorite electric pasta maker was the priciest of the bunch, at about $250. It effortlessly made spaghetti, fettuccine, and sheets of lasagna. It produced good penne, too. At times, the penne had a slight curl to its ends, but it still had defined ridges, which we liked. We liked its simple control panel and the flat-edged tool for cutting the extruded pasta. Like all the pasta machines, it took a bit of time to clean. And while it came with just four shaping disks (for spaghetti, fettuccine, penne, and lasagna sheets), you can buy extra attachments for shells, paccheri, rigatoni, macaroni, angel hair, pappardelle, and tagliatelle. 

Equipment Review Electric Pasta Machines

Is an Electric Pasta Machine the Key to Perfect Pasta at Home? 

We tested three electric pasta machines to see which one could make the best spaghetti, fettuccine, penne, and more. 

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JC
JOHN C.
16 days

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too. I've done this using a rimmed sheet pan instead of a skillet and put veggies and potatoes around the chicken for a one-pan meal. Broccoli gets nicely browned and yummy!

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too.

MD
MILES D.
JOHN C.
9 days

Amazed this recipe works out as well as it does. Would not have thought that the amount of time under the broiler would have produced a very juicy and favorable chicken with a very crispy crust. Used my 12" Lodge Cast Iron skillet (which can withstand 1000 degree temps to respond to those who wondered if it would work) and it turned out great. A "make again" as my family rates things. This is a great recipe, and I will definitely make it again. My butcher gladly butterflied the chicken for me, therefore I found it to be a fast and easy prep. I used my cast iron skillet- marvellous!

CM
CHARLES M.
11 days

John, wasn't it just amazing chicken? So much better than your typical oven baked chicken and on par if not better than gas or even charcoal grilled. It gets that smokey charcoal tasted and overnight koshering definitely helps, something I do when time permits. First-time I've pierced a whole chicken minus the times I make jerk chicken on the grill. Yup, the cast iron was not an issue.