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The Best Reusable Face Masks

By Riddley Gemperlein-Schirm Published

We tested 13 face masks to find the options that are the easiest to use, the most comfortable to wear, and the most protective. We also learned how to remove and wash masks safely.

Back in March, when COVID-19 restrictions were being put in place in Massachusetts, I tried to buy some face masks, but they were sold out everywhere. After a month or so of rationing the few surgical masks I had managed to scrounge up, the first reusable cloth mask I preordered came in the mail. But it didn’t fit well, leaving gaps around my nose and by my ears. I’ve been on the hunt for the perfect face mask ever since.

You’re probably wondering, is there a perfect face mask? We had the same question, so we put more than a dozen masks to the test. But first, let’s say this: There are many cloth face masks available. We knew we couldn’t test them all, so we asked our America’s Test Kitchen colleagues what masks they have and what they like and don’t like about them. We then narrowed our scope to 14 masks, priced from about $9 to $70, and made from a variety of materials, shapes, and styles. 

To see which masks were protective, simple to put on, comfortable to wear, and easy to clean, we put them through a host of tests: taking them on and off repeatedly; seeing if we could blow out a candle while wearing them (a basic barrier efficacy test); walking and running while wearing them; having users of different face shapes, sizes, and features try each mask on; and washing the masks after each use. We also used a thermal imaging camera to see where heat (aka our breath) was escaping through each mask.

Does Mask Material Matter?

Yes! A mask’s material definitely contributes to its effectiveness. To find out why, we spoke with Kim Trautman, executive vice president of medical device international services for the NSF International. Our masks were made from natural fibers (such as cotton and linen), synthetic fibers (such as polyester, silicone, and spandex), or both. Trautman said that masks made from natural fibers filter particles better than those made with synthetic fibers because natural fibers are more irregular in shape. Synthetic fibers, she explained, are smoother and organized more uniformly at a microscopic level, resulting in entrances that are easier for particles, especially small ones, to pass through. 

Should You Wear a Filter with a Mask?

  • While our favorite masks did have filter pockets in common, we tested them without filters in place to see if they would be protective and breathable on their own. Filters are a way of adding another layer of protection, explains Kim Trautman, executive vice president of medical device international services for the NSF International. Some masks came with their own filters, such as ones made from charcoal, and the option to buy refills, but these can be pricey. “The simple utilizing of the mask, having good fit, fiber, and flow, are so much more important than the expense of doing charcoal filters,” Trautman says. Focus on finding a mask that balances effective filtration with comfort first. If you want to try a filter for an added layer of protection, Trautman suggests using a coffee filter or a paper towel instead of investing in pricier filters. It’s also important to note that these filters are a one-and-done thing: use them for a day and then toss them—they’re catching germs, after all and are not reusable.

     

    Some suggested that some DIY filters, such as vacuum bags, were never meant to be breathed through, so the jury is out on their safety. Use your best judgment, and be sure that a filter doesn’t have something dangerous in it, such as fiberglass.

     

    (Picture on the left) Storebought filters (white) vs. DIY filters (brown) made from coffee filters.

Another important point to consider when choosing a mask is how well it balances breathability with filtration. According to Trautman, “Making sure the wearer is comfortable enough to wear [the mask] for long durations without fiddling with it” is very crucial. Tightly woven masks made from natural fibers may not be as breathable as those made from synthetic fibers, so some masks on the market are a mix of natural and synthetic fibers and have multiple layers of fabric. “In general, natural fibers are better, but if you have multiple-layer masks (which I recommend highly, at least a 2- or 3-layer mask), there you can actually blend a natural fiber layer and a synthetic fiber layer, “ Trautman explains, getting the best possible experience of both filtration and breathability. 

Should You Wear a Face Shield?

Most experts say that face shields are really only appropriate in very specific circumstances. “Face shields are not meant to be used for protecting against respiratory viruses that are hanging in the air that you breathe in,” Dr. Fortune says. A face shield, in addition to a mask, should be worn really only in circumstances where people are superclose to one another, such as in a hospital. “If you’re in Whole Foods, unless you get right up in your cashier’s face, the only droplets that are going to come near you are small and in the air,” she explains.

How to Tell if a Mask Is Effective

To see how well the masks theoretically filtered particles (also called barrier efficacy), we put the masks on, adjusted them as necessary so that they fit securely, and then tried to blow out a lit birthday candle. Why the candle test? “It is a very simple way to assess how much barrier efficacy there is,” says Dr. Sarah Fortune, professor of immunology and infectious diseases and chair of the department of immunology and infectious diseases at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. We repeated this test after the masks had been washed several times to make sure that long-term use wouldn’t affect the masks’ effectiveness.

Masks that allowed us to blow out a candle (like left) did not have sufficient barrier efficacy, while masks that prevented us from extinguishing the candle (like right) passed this effectiveness test, preventing our breath from passing right through them.

The good news: Most of the masks didn’t allow us to blow out the candle, which is a sign that they had sufficient barrier efficacy. The masks that failed this test were noticeably thinner than the others, and the worst performer was made from 100 percent synthetic fabrics. These masks were also often situated closer to our mouths when on, allowing our breath to pass right through. The pleated masks we tried failed the candle test; they also felt thinner and flimsier than the other masks in our lineup. The best performers had multiple layers of fabric made of cotton and synthetic materials, either blended together or layered on top of one another, and allowed for more space between our mouths and the masks where our exhaled breath pooled inside the mask instead of shooting straight out.

A thermal imaging camera shed some light on the results of our barrier efficacy candle test. In the left and center images, you can clearly see the bright-yellow to almost-white hot spots that indicate where the heat escaped from poorly performing masks. One of the better-performing masks (right) contained the heat more evenly.

We took pictures of ourselves in each mask using a thermal imaging camera to shed some more light on the masks’ effectiveness. The worst performers clearly had “hot spots” showing where breath (and any accompanying germs) were escaping the masks. The best masks more evenly distributed the heat around the inside of the mask when the wearer exhaled, diffusing the oxygen more gently into the surrounding air and thus containing more germs.

How to Do the Candle Test

To see if your mask is protective: Put it on, determine whether the fit is tight and if it feels like there is air escaping, and then grab a birthday candle. Light the candle, hold it in front of your mask, and try to blow it out. If the candle isn’t extinguished, your mask passes the barrier efficacy test, meaning it has sufficient filtration capabilities.

We ran in each mask for a 1/2-mile, determining how breathable and comfortable each was to wear during an activity that resulted in more labored breathing.

We then moved on to testing breathability by walking for 5 minutes and then running for 5 minutes in each mask. All but one of the masks were comfortable to walk in. The one that failed this test had a tight seal and high filtration capabilities, which made it hard to breathe—so much so that one tester remarked while wearing it, “It feels like I’m having an asthma attack.” However, all but four of the masks were uncomfortable to run in, with testers noting that they felt like they were inhaling fabric. Unfortunately, two of the four masks that were comfortable to run in had previously failed the candle test, meaning they didn’t have great filtration. This is all to say: Every mask is likely to have its pros and cons, and we didn’t find a mask that was perfect to run in, had excellent filtration, and fit every face. This is not meant to sound pessimistic but rather to acknowledge that even the best reusable masks will feel uncomfortable under different circumstances for different people. 

How to Find the Best Fit

Another deciding factor when it comes to finding a good mask? Fit. “I think people are super obsessed with the material question,” Dr. Fortune says, “The most important thing you can do rather than obsessing about whether the barrier function of this mask is ever-so-slightly different than the barrier function of that mask is find a mask that fits you and fits your face as best you possibly can.” If you can feel gaps around your nose, ears, cheeks, or chin, the mask is not as effective as it could be. We evaluated the fit of the masks in our lineup by having testers with various face shapes, face sizes, and features (such as a beard or glasses) wear the masks and determining how securely each mask fit each person. 

We had testers of varying face sizes and features (like glasses and beards) try each mask on, collecting feedback on how each mask fit, how breathable they were, and how easy they were to put on.

Headbands, Loops, and Ties: What's the Best?

First up in fit: putting the masks on. The masks attached to our heads in a variety of ways, and we liked some more than others. Fastening styles included loops that hooked behind our ears, sets of two or four strings that we tied behind our heads, bands, or some combination thereof. The masks with ear loops were the easiest to put on. However, testers with smaller faces often preferred the masks that tied behind their heads, because they allowed for a more tailored, tighter fit. And while the tie-on masks did take longer to put on than the ear-loop masks, testers with smaller faces valued a secure fit over saving the few seconds it took to adjust the ties. Of the masks with ties, we preferred those with ribbon or fabric ties to the one model with nylon cords, which were slippery and thus harder to tie.

Masks with ear loops (like left) were easiest to put on and we particularly liked adjustable ear loops, which allowed for a more tailored fit. Masks with ties (like right) took a bit more time to put on, but testers with smaller faces felt they were able to get a tighter, better fit with this style.

Comparing Mask Shape and Adjustable Features

Once attached, the shape of each mask also affected how well it fit. We preferred masks with a hump-shaped nose piece that raised them up off our mouths. They were easier to breathe in, fit more securely under our chins, and allowed for minimal gaps. Rectangular masks left too many gaps around the sides of our noses especially, while pleated masks, which are designed to fit different nose shapes and chin lengths, didn’t allow for a tight enough fit, especially around our noses. We also tested one face gaiter (see "Neck Gaiters: Is It Safe to Wear One as a Mask?"), but it did not fit small faces well and tended to fall down too easily.

How to Properly Remove a Mask

  • Remove with hands by ear loops or strings

     

    Don’t touch exterior (to avoid transferring germs from exterior to interior)

     

    Don’t touch interior (to avoid transferring germs from interior to other surfaces, such as restaurant tables)

Lastly, the masks that fit best were adjustable. Many of the masks in our lineup were available only in one size, and unless the masks had features such as adjustable loops or metal nose pieces that molded to the face, they did not fit everyone and often skewed bigger, working best for larger faces. We preferred masks with adjustable nose wires and adjustable ear loops, as they allowed wearers to tailor the fit of the masks to their faces. If the ear loops didn’t have an adjustable component or were made from elastic, we had success knotting them to get the mask to fit more snugly.

Neck Gaiters: Is It Safe to Wear One as a Mask?

  • Do neck gaiters—the sleeve-like neck, face, or head coverings made popular by runners—provide much masking function? Not much. But do they have some benefits? Yes. “They are keeping you from touching your face,” Dr. Fortune says. “And so it’s reminding you about hygiene.” There is also some filtration offered, but not nearly as much as other masks. It’s also worth considering where you’ll be wearing the neck gaiters: If they’re used primarily for running or walking outside, the risk of acquiring or transmitting COVID-19 in an outdoor setting is very low.

In the end, each of our testers preferred different masks—and each mask fit everyone a bit differently, no matter how adjustable they were. However, we can name an all-around best mask, one that ticked the boxes for safety, fit, breathability, and ease of use for the highest percentage of testers.

How to Wash Your Face Masks

During testing, we followed each manufacturer’s instructions for washing face masks, and all the models were fairly easy to clean. However, some manufacturers called for washing the masks in cold water, while others suggested hot water, and some advised air drying, while others called for tumble drying. Which method is best? “It’s very important that they’re washed in warm or hot water and that they’re dried with heat,” Trautman says. Heat kills germs, she explains. Putting them in the dryer is ideal (and we favored masks that could be dried this way). As far as how often you should be washing your mask, Trautman says you can take a couple of routes: If you’re wearing your mask all day, you should absolutely wash it after use, but if you’re running out to do an errand, you can “quarantine” your mask, meaning let it sit unused for for 5 to 7 days. The latter method works if you have several masks you can rotate through (Trautman is a fan of having multiple masks—one for each day of the week) and helps to extend the life of each mask. 

The Best All-Around Cloth Face Mask

The Mandala Antimicrobial + Fluid Resistant Face Mask fit all our testers nicely, and its double-layered construction passed our filtration tests. Its hump-shaped nose piece and adjustable nose wire and ear loops allowed us to create a more customized, well-tailored fit, and it had an added filter pocket (see “Should You Wear a Filter with a Mask?”). Although it was too thick to comfortably run in, it was perfectly fine for walking around. While this mask’s “antimicrobial” properties have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, we did like that this mask’s outer layer was waterproof. A study by researchers at Northeastern University reported that using a waterproof cloth material to make a face mask could increase its effectiveness, acting as a barrier to repel respiratory droplets from entering through the mask. For a mask that is protective, comfortable, easy to put on, and fits most face shapes, we think this is an excellent option. And while this is our favorite all-around mask, we’ve also identified options for running, larger faces, and smaller faces. Since new masks are being introduced each day, we will continue to test new entries and update this story accordingly.

More Masks We Recommend

  • THE BEST ALL-AROUND CLOTH MASK 

    Mandala Antimicrobial + Fluid Resistant Face Mask 

    BUY ON WEARMANDALA.COM

    Price: $9.99

    Attachment Style: Ear loops

    Number of Sizes: 2 (adult, kid)

    Features: Adjustable nose wire, adjustable ear loops, filter pocket

    Materials: 75% polyester/19% viscose/6% spandex outer layer, 100% cotton inner layer
    Care instructions: Machine washable, but recommend hand washing and air drying to increase longevity

    Efficacy: ***
    Ease of Use: ***
    Adjustability: ***
    Cleaning/Durability: ***

    Pros: Made from a mix of natural and synthetic materials, adjustable nose wire and ear loops which allowed for a tailored fit, fit snugly underneath the chin, easy to put on, waterproof outer layer and cotton inner layer, didn’t fog up glasses, machine washable, comfortable to walk around in

    Con: Uncomfortable to run in 

     

  • ALL-AROUND RUNNER-UP 

    Snoozies Cloth Mask 

    BUY ON AMAZON

    Price: $14.99
    Attachment Style: Ear loops
    Number of Sizes: 1
    Features: Adjustable nose wire, adjustable ear loops, filter pocket
    Materials: Polyester outside layer, spunbonded second layer, cotton third layer
    Care Instructions: Machine washable 

    Efficacy: ***
    Ease of Use: ***
    Adjustability: ***
    Cleaning/Durability: ***

    Pros: Easy to put on, adjustable nose wire and ear loops, filter pocket, three layers of fabric, soft material, chin portion for added security, comfortable to walk around in, comes in a variety of prints, machine washable

    Cons: Thicker, which made the mask warmer and tougher to breathe through for some; fogged up glasses a touch; not suitable for running

     

  • BEST FOR WALKING/RUNNING 

    UA Sportsmask

    BUY ON UNDERARMOUR.COM

    Price: $30

    Attachment style: Ear loops 

    Sizes: 5 (XS/S, S/M, M/L, L/XL, XL/XXL)

    Features: Adjustable metal nose wire

    Materials: Outer layer: 100% Polyester; insert: 100% Polyurethane; interior/ear loops: 77% Nylon/23% Spandex

    Care instructions: Hand wash recommended or machine wash cool on gentle/delicate cycle & lay flat to dry

    Efficacy: ***

    Ease of Use: ***

    Adjustability: **½

    Cleanup/Durability: **

    Pros: Very breathable, adjustable nose wire, easy to put on and take off, soft and comfortable ear loops, sits off the face/mouth, excellent for walking and running, waterproof outer layer, comes in many different sizes

    Cons: Lacks adjustable ear loops, slight gapping around the nose 

     

  • ALSO GOOD FOR WALKING/RUNNING 

    United By Blue Salvaged Hemp Blend Face Mask (3-Pack) - Large/Adult

    BUY ON UNITEDBYBLUE.COM 

    Price: $20 ($6.67 per mask)

    Attachment Style: Ear loops

    Number of Sizes: 2 (adult, youth)

    Features: Filter pocket

    Materials: A blend of hemp, organic cotton, recycled polyester, and TENCEL

    Care Instructions: Machine-wash on delicate and tumble dry on low 

    Efficacy: ***

    Ease of Use: ***

    Adjustability: **

    Cleaning/Durability: ***

    Pros: Breathable, easy to put on, filter pocket, better for larger faces, easy to walk in, fairly comfortable for running, machine washable and dryable 

    Cons: Ear loops are not adjustable, but you can knot the elastic ear loops to help fit smaller faces

     

  • GOOD FOR LARGER FACES 

    Hedley & Bennett Wake Up & Fight Mask

    BUY ON HEDLEYANDBENNETT.COM 

    Price: $22.00

    Attachment Style: Ear loops

    Number of Sizes:

    Features: Adjustable nose wire, filter pocket

    Material: 100% cotton or 60/40 cotton-poly (contents vary)

    Care Instructions: Hand-wash, lay flat to dry, do not iron 

    Efficacy: ***

    Ease of Use: ***

    Adjustability: **

    Cleaning/Durability:

    Pros: Breathable, easy to put on, adjustable nose wire, filter pocket, favorite of testers with larger faces

    Cons: Ear loops aren’t adjustable; filter pocket is in front of your mouth (rather than at side of mask), which was annoying to some as our lips tended to fiddle with the flap; too big for smaller faces; not great for running; have to hand-wash

     

  • ALSO GOOD FOR LARGER FACES

    Atoms Everyday Face Mask

    BUY ON ATOMS.COM

    Price: $12.00

    Attachment Style: Ear loops

    Number of Sizes: 5 (XXS, XS, S, M, and L)

    Features: N/A

    Materials: Polyester blend outer layer and a copper-lined ionized quartz yarn inner layer

    Care Instructions: Hand-wash, air-dry

    Efficacy: ***

    Ease of Use: ***

    Adjustability: *

    Cleaning/Durability:

    Pros: Easy to put on, comes in variety of sizes, better for larger faces, comfortable ear loops

    Cons: Ear loops aren’t adjustable, ran a bit large, slid down nose too easily, no adjustable elements, no filter pocket, not suitable for running in

     

  • BEST FOR SMALLER FACES

    The Wake Up & Fight Mask - Rifle Paper Co. Edition

    BUY ON HEDLEYANDBENNETT.COM

    Price: $22.00

    Attachment Style: 1 head loop, 1 set of ties 

    Number of Sizes: 1

    Features: Adjustable nose wire, filter pocket

    Materials: Fabric body is 80% cotton and 20% linen; inner lining is 98% cotton and 2% spandex

    Care Instructions: Hand-wash, lay flat to dry, do not iron 

    Efficacy: ***

    Ease of Use: **

    Adjustability: ***

    Cleaning/Durability:

    Pros: Breathable; adjustable nose wire; filter pocket; easy-to-tie straps; attachment style allowed for a secure, customized fit, which made this mask a favorite among those with smaller faces; didn’t fog up glasses; can hang around neck when not on face 

    Cons: Took more time to put on than ear loop masks; filter pocket was in front of our mouths (rather than at side of mask), which was annoying to some since our lips tended to fiddle with the flap; not ideal for running; had to hand-wash

     

  • RUNNER-UP FOR SMALLER FACES

    Birdwell Beach Britches Reversible Mask

    BUY ON BIRDWELL.COM

    Price: $19.95

    Attachment Style: 2 sets of ties

    Number of Sizes: 1

    Features: N/A

    Materials: One layer of indigo chambray cotton, one layer of polyester micro knit

    Care Instructions: Machine-wash cold, lay flat to dry

    Efficacy: ***

    Ease of Use:

    Adjustability:

    Cleaning/Durability: **

    Pros: Breathable, came with cord locks to secure the mask’s ties, attachment style was more adjustable for those with smaller faces, machine washable 

    Cons: Ties took more time to adjust than the ear loop masks, no adjustable nose wire, no filter pocket, ties were made from nylon cord that felt slippery, ties felt slightly short, not ideal for running

Masks We Do Not Recommend

  • GIR Reusable Face Mask 2.0

    Price: $15.00

    Attachment Style: Ear loops (equipped with a clip to fasten loops at the back of the head if mask is too large)

    Number of Sizes: 3 (medium, large, kids) 

    Feature: Filters

    Material: Silicone 

    Care Instructions: Clean in the dishwasher (wash on medium heat with mild detergent), microwave for 90 seconds in a bowl of water, hand-wash with hot soapy water for at least 20 seconds, place in an ovensafe dish and bake at 300°F for 5 minutes, or sterilize in an autoclave 

    Efficacy: ***

    Ease of Use: **

    Adjustability: ½

    Cleaning/Durability: **

    Pros: Breathable, easy to put on, several different ways to clean 

    Cons: No adjustable ear loops; sizable gaps around nose; perforations at front made it useless without a filter; you had to buy special filters that had sticky portions on both sides so that they adhered to the masks; mouth was right against the filters, which testers disliked the feel of (preferring masks with filter pockets); silicone material made faces feel sweaty

     

  • Ugmonk Face Mask

    Price: $10.00

    Attachment Style: Ear loops

    Number of Sizes: 2 (adult, kids) 

    Features: n/a

    Materials: 2-ply fabric (52% cotton, 48% polyester)

    Care Instructions: Machine washable 

    Efficacy: 0

    Ease of Use: ***

    Adjustability: ½

    Cleaning/Durability: ***

    Pros: Breathable, easy to put on, soft material, better for larger faces, fine to walk in

    Cons: Failed the candle test after washing, lacks adjustable features, did not fit smaller faces well, not suitable for running as it felt like we were inhaling fabric

     

  • Old Navy Variety 5-Pack of Triple-Layer Cloth Face Masks for Adults

    Price: $12.50 ($2.50 per mask)

    Attachment Style: Ear loops

    Number of Sizes: 2 (adult, kids) 

    Features: n/a

    Material: 3-ply, 100% cotton

    Care Instructions: Machine-wash cold; tumble dry low

    Efficacy: 0

    Ease of Use: ***

    Adjustability: *

    Cleanup/Durability: ***

    Pros: Breathable, easy to put on, pleats allowed for more nose-to-chin coverage, fit a variety of face sizes, fine to walk and run in, machine washable and dryable 

    Cons: Did not pass the candle test, noticeable gaps near nose, material is a bit scratchy

     

  • Baggu Fabric Mask Set

    Price: $32.00 for three ($10.67 per mask)

    Attachment Style: 1 continual head loop, 1 set of ties 

    Number of Sizes: 1

    Features: n/a

    Material: 100% cotton

    Care Instructions: Machine washable; lay flat to dry

    Efficacy: 0

    Ease of Use: *

    Adjustability:

    Cleaning/Durability: **

    Pros: Breathable, adjustable nose wire, filter pocket, attachment style felt secure with a variety of face shapes

    Cons: Complicated to put on, did not pass the candle test, mask sat right against the mouth, thin fabric

     

  • O2 Curve 

    Price: $69.99

    Attachment Style: Elastic strap and ear loops 

    Number of Sizes: 2 (high-bridge or low-bridge)

    Features: Adjustable elastic strap and ear loops, filter insert

    Materials: Silicone seal, elastic ear loops, plastic outer shell

    Care Instructions: Use an alcohol-free cleaning wipe to clean front shell and silicone pieces; clean with similar cleaning wipe or with warm water and soap each time you change the filter 

    Efficacy: ***

    Ease of Use: 0

    Adjustability: *

    Cleaning/Durability: **

    Pros: Extremely protective, each filter lasts one to two weeks

    Cons: Hard to put on due to its multiple components (ear loops and behind-the-head strap), hard to adjust to fit properly, tough to breathe through, tough to walk in, almost impossible to run in, have to buy specific filters that fit inside of mask, mask was expensive

     

  • Mission Cooling Gaiter/Face Cover

    Price: $19.99

    Attachment Style: Neck gaiter 

    Number of Sizes: 2 (adult, youth)

    Features: n/a

    Materials: 92% Polyester/8% Spandex

    Care Instructions: Machine washable

    Efficacy: 0

    Ease of Use: **

    Adjustability: ½

    Cleaning/Durability: ***

    Pros: Breathable, fine to run and walk in, fit larger faces, machine washable

    Cons: Did not pass the candle test, did not fill smaller faces as well, no adjustable features, no filter pocket

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JC
JOHN C.
16 days

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too. I've done this using a rimmed sheet pan instead of a skillet and put veggies and potatoes around the chicken for a one-pan meal. Broccoli gets nicely browned and yummy!

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too.

MD
MILES D.
JOHN C.
9 days

Amazed this recipe works out as well as it does. Would not have thought that the amount of time under the broiler would have produced a very juicy and favorable chicken with a very crispy crust. Used my 12" Lodge Cast Iron skillet (which can withstand 1000 degree temps to respond to those who wondered if it would work) and it turned out great. A "make again" as my family rates things. This is a great recipe, and I will definitely make it again. My butcher gladly butterflied the chicken for me, therefore I found it to be a fast and easy prep. I used my cast iron skillet- marvellous!

CM
CHARLES M.
11 days

John, wasn't it just amazing chicken? So much better than your typical oven baked chicken and on par if not better than gas or even charcoal grilled. It gets that smokey charcoal tasted and overnight koshering definitely helps, something I do when time permits. First-time I've pierced a whole chicken minus the times I make jerk chicken on the grill. Yup, the cast iron was not an issue.