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Sourdough Discard Seeded Crackers

By Andrew Janjigian Published

Crackers are one of the easiest and best uses of sourdough discard there is.

Note: Throughout the Quarantiny Starter Project I've been developing recipes at home to keep up with demand, for everything from sourdough pancakes, biscuits, and of course bread. We're calling these "beta recipes" as they haven't gone through the rigorous weeks-long testing process as the rest of the recipes on the site. That said, they've worked well for me at home and I'm excited to share them with you. If you do make them I'd love your feedback so I can continue to tweak, adjust, and improve them for everyone.

Crackers are one of the easiest and best uses of sourdough discard there is. This dough is quick to come together, doesn’t need resting before rolling out, and is deeply flavorful, thanks to the tang of the discard and the large amount of whole wheat it contains. And it’s versatile, since you can use a mixture of whatever sorts of small seeds—black or white sesame, flax, poppy, chia, quinoa, amaranth—and aromatic seedy spices—things such as caraway, fennel, nigella, anise—you like.

Seeded Whole Wheat Sourdough Discard Crackers

Makes 30 to 40 crackers

Use a mixture of whatever small seeds you like, including black or white sesame, flax, poppy, chia, quinoa, amaranth, etc. For spices, use small seed spices such as caraway, fennel, nigella, anise, etc., in any combination you like.

1½ cups plus 1 tablespoon (245 grams) whole wheat flour
½ cup (75 grams) mixed small seeds
1 to 2 teaspoons whole seed spices
1 teaspoon table salt
½ cup (150 grams) 100% hydration sourdough discard
6 tablespoons (85 grams) water
3 tablespoons (50 grams) extra-virgin olive oil
1 egg white, beaten
1 to 2 teaspoons flake salt

1. Adjust oven racks to upper-middle and lower-middle positions and heat oven to 325 degrees. Mix whole wheat flour, seeds, spices, and table salt in medium bowl and whisk to combine. Add sourdough discard, water, and oil, and stir with wooden spoon until uniform. Knead dough on lightly floured counter until smooth. Divide into three equal portions (about 210 grams each) and form each into smooth balls. Cover loosely with plastic wrap.

2. Working with one dough ball at a time, using rolling pin on well-floured counter, roll into rough 10- by 8-inch rectangle, adding flour as necessary to prevent sticking. Transfer to parchment paper and continue to roll into rough 14- by 12-inch rectangle. Using fork, prick dough with fork 20 to 30 times evenly across surface of dough. Brush evenly with egg white and sprinkle with flake salt.

3. Transfer parchment to baking sheet and place on lower rack of oven. Bake for 12 minutes. While first sheet bakes, repeat rolling and topping with second ball of dough.

4. Move first sheet to upper rack, place second sheet on bottom rack, and continue to bake until first sheet is evenly golden brown, 12 to 15 minutes. Transfer fully baked sheet of crackers on parchment to rack and allow to cool completely.

5. Repeat steps 2 to 4 with remaining ball of dough. Allow sheets to cool completely before breaking into large pieces. Crackers can be stored at room temperature for up to 2 weeks in airtight container.

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JOHN C.
16 days

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too. I've done this using a rimmed sheet pan instead of a skillet and put veggies and potatoes around the chicken for a one-pan meal. Broccoli gets nicely browned and yummy!

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too.

MD
MILES D.
JOHN C.
9 days

Amazed this recipe works out as well as it does. Would not have thought that the amount of time under the broiler would have produced a very juicy and favorable chicken with a very crispy crust. Used my 12" Lodge Cast Iron skillet (which can withstand 1000 degree temps to respond to those who wondered if it would work) and it turned out great. A "make again" as my family rates things. This is a great recipe, and I will definitely make it again. My butcher gladly butterflied the chicken for me, therefore I found it to be a fast and easy prep. I used my cast iron skillet- marvellous!

CM
CHARLES M.
11 days

John, wasn't it just amazing chicken? So much better than your typical oven baked chicken and on par if not better than gas or even charcoal grilled. It gets that smokey charcoal tasted and overnight koshering definitely helps, something I do when time permits. First-time I've pierced a whole chicken minus the times I make jerk chicken on the grill. Yup, the cast iron was not an issue.