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Testing Pie Servers

By Emily Phares Published

Don’t destroy your pretty pie with a subpar serving tool.

Baking a pie is one thing. Serving it is another. You can use a knife, but a pie server, essentially a pointed spatula, is specifically designed to cut, remove, and transport pie slices and should produce picturesque, intact pieces.

When we last tested pie servers, we named the OXO SteeL Pie Server ($9.99) as our top pick, owing to its comfortable handle and broad serrated blade. But with new models on the market, we decided to retest, selecting six options priced from $6.95 to $35.95, including our previous winner.

We used the servers to slice single- and double-crust pies—both homemade and store-bought varieties, since these crusts can differ—as well as homemade cookie-crust pies. We also chose a variety of fillings to see how each tool handled different textures: smooth custard with an airy whipped cream topping; chunky fruit; and dense pecans. At the conclusion of testing, we had nearly 300 slices of pie and one clear winner. We found that three factors were most important: cutting ability, slice removal, and comfort.

Assistant Editor Emily Phares takes notes as Executive Editor Lisa McManus slices several pies with each pie server in our lineup.

Pie Server Testing: You’re Gonna Need a Lot of Pies

A Pie Server That Can Slice Cleanly

The first job of a pie server is to cut through the filling and crust (or crusts). Here, blade material and design were key. One model with smooth, dull steel edges couldn’t easily slice into thicker crusts or the firm, nutty top of a pecan pie. Another model with a nylon blade struggled with the initial crust piercing; the blade bowed outward instead of driving straight down through the pie. The best pie servers had rigid stainless‑steel blades with serrated edges. Though the steel models had different styles of serrations—from pointy teeth to larger scallops—all were able to effortlessly bite into the crust. However, one downside to the stainless-steel models was that they all left our favorite pie plate, which is nonstick, somewhat scratched. The nylon model was gentler.

The Right Design for Removing Slices

But cutting slices was only half the equation. Next we had to remove them—and it wasn’t always easy. Two of the servers’ blades, at 5 and 7 inches, respectively, were too long to deftly navigate a standard 9-inch pie plate. They couldn’t fit neatly underneath a single slice, sometimes leaving crust stranded in the bottom of the plate. One of these long models was also too narrow and had trouble during transport; slices felt unsteady on the slender 1⅞-inch-wide blade. Our top performers were shorter (approximately 4 to 4½ inches long) and wider (2½ to 3 inches across at the base); they were easier to maneuver under pies and held slices more securely.

An offset handle, which tilts up and away from the blade at an angle, was also crucial. The one model with a straight handle couldn’t get under the pie slices as cleanly and often left some crust behind. The remaining five models had offset handles, which allowed us to more easily maneuver their blades down and under pie slices for tidy removal.

A Rounded, Rubbery Grip Was Most Comfortable

Handles varied in shape and material, both of which had a big impact on comfort. One model had a thin, flat metal handle, and the hard edges pressed uncomfortably against our palms during use. The other servers had oval handles, and of these, testers liked the more bulbous options; they were easier to hold than narrower ones. Of the handle materials in our lineup, we preferred soft, rubbery grips best. This was a key feature of our top‑rated pie server; testers praised its “really comfortable” handle, which had small ridges for extra grip.

The Best Pie Server

After slicing nearly 40 pies, we once again named the OXO SteeL Pie Server ($9.99) our winner. Its relatively short, wide blade perfectly cut, removed, and transported slices. It had serrations on both sides, so it worked for both right-handed and left-handed testers. Finally, this server’s round, rubbery offset handle allowed us to neatly maneuver under pie and provided a comfortable, secure grip, making it easy to slice all types of pie. However, if you’re using a nonstick pie plate and are concerned about scratching it, you might want to consider the OXO Good Grips Nylon Flexible Pie Server ($6.95). Its nylon blade sometimes struggled to cut through thick crusts, but it wasn’t as harsh on our pie plate and its flexibility made it easy to remove intact, attractive slices.

Equipment Review Pie Servers

Don’t destroy your pretty pie with a subpar serving tool.

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JC
JOHN C.
16 days

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too. I've done this using a rimmed sheet pan instead of a skillet and put veggies and potatoes around the chicken for a one-pan meal. Broccoli gets nicely browned and yummy!

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too.

MD
MILES D.
JOHN C.
9 days

Amazed this recipe works out as well as it does. Would not have thought that the amount of time under the broiler would have produced a very juicy and favorable chicken with a very crispy crust. Used my 12" Lodge Cast Iron skillet (which can withstand 1000 degree temps to respond to those who wondered if it would work) and it turned out great. A "make again" as my family rates things. This is a great recipe, and I will definitely make it again. My butcher gladly butterflied the chicken for me, therefore I found it to be a fast and easy prep. I used my cast iron skillet- marvellous!

CM
CHARLES M.
11 days

John, wasn't it just amazing chicken? So much better than your typical oven baked chicken and on par if not better than gas or even charcoal grilled. It gets that smokey charcoal tasted and overnight koshering definitely helps, something I do when time permits. First-time I've pierced a whole chicken minus the times I make jerk chicken on the grill. Yup, the cast iron was not an issue.