Coffee Pudding Cake

Published January 1, 1995.

Why this recipe works:

In developing our pudding cake recipe, we baked some 15 pudding cakes, noticing that those made with lemon or orange juice came out especially well, while those flavored in other ways tended to have flimsy, fast-dissolving tops and rubbery, dense bottoms. We eventually deduced that it was the… read more

In developing our pudding cake recipe, we baked some 15 pudding cakes, noticing that those made with lemon or orange juice came out especially well, while those flavored in other ways tended to have flimsy, fast-dissolving tops and rubbery, dense bottoms. We eventually deduced that it was the acidity of the citrus juices that made the difference. Because the juice lightly clabbered the milk-based batter, causing it to thicken, the frothy upper layer became stiffer and more stable and thus better able to puff. At the same time, the acidic juice undercut the thickening power of the flour, making a more tender custard. To shore up the cake part of those pudding cake recipes made with coffee, chocolate, and vanilla, we added an extra egg white.

less

Serves 4 to 6

This pudding cake can be made in any of the following: 6 - 3/4 cup custard cups; 4 - 1 1/3 cup ramekins or miniature souffle cups; 1 - 9" round cake pan; 1 - 8" square cake pan. All pudding cakes, regardless of pan size, require the same baking time. This cake tastes best when made with super-strong coffee. The easiest way to make it strong is to cover 1/3 cup finely ground coffee with 2/3 cup boiling water and let it stand for 5 minutes, then drip through a coffee filter.

Ingredients

In My Favorites
Please Wait…
Remove Favorite
Add to custom collection