Thick-Cut Sweet Potato Fries

From Cook's Illustrated | March/April 2014

Why this recipe works:

Despite their namesake, sweet potatoes have little in common with russet potatoes—arguably the ideal potato variety for making French fries. To compensate for sweet potatoes’ lack of sufficient starch, we coated thick-cut sweet potato wedges with a cornstarch slurry that quickly turned crispy… read more

Despite their namesake, sweet potatoes have little in common with russet potatoes—arguably the ideal potato variety for making French fries. To compensate for sweet potatoes’ lack of sufficient starch, we coated thick-cut sweet potato wedges with a cornstarch slurry that quickly turned crispy when fried. To ensure well-seasoned creamy, sweet interiors, we first treated the sweet potatoes to a blanch in water spiked with salt. Adding baking soda to the blanching water caused the potatoes’ exteriors to turn mushy and slough into the slurry, creating a more substantial, pleasingly orange crust. To limit sticking and cut down drastically on frying oil, we switched from frying in a Dutch oven to a 12-inch nonstick skillet. Finally (and optionally), we ditched commonplace supersweet ketchup in favor of an easy spicy, creamy fry sauce for serving.

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Thick-Cut Sweet Potato Fries

Classic French fries made with white potatoes—crispy on the outside, creamy on the inside—set a high bar. We wanted sweet potato fries that could truly compete.

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Serves 4 to 6

If your sweet potatoes are shorter than 4 inches in length, do not cut the wedges crosswise. We prefer peanut oil for frying, but vegetable oil may be used instead. Leftover frying oil may be saved for further use; strain the cooled oil into an airtight container and store it in a cool, dark place for up to one month or in the freezer for up to two months. We like these fries with our Spicy Fry Sauce (see related content), but they are also good served plain.

Ingredients

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