Kahlua Souffle with Ground Espresso

Published September 1, 2000.

Why this recipe works:

Our simple, foolproof soufflé recipe began with a base of bouille (a paste made from flour and milk), enhanced with butter and extra flour for a creamy rather than foamy soufflé. We whipped the egg whites with cream of tartar and granulated sugar, both of which made the whites more stable.… read more

Our simple, foolproof soufflé recipe began with a base of bouille (a paste made from flour and milk), enhanced with butter and extra flour for a creamy rather than foamy soufflé. We whipped the egg whites with cream of tartar and granulated sugar, both of which made the whites more stable. Baking our soufflé at high heat (400 degrees) gave it a more dramatic rise and created more contrast between the cooked exterior and the creamy, saucy interior.

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Serves 6 to 8

Make the soufflé base and immediately begin beating the whites before the base cools too much. Once the whites have reached the proper consistency, they must be used at once. Do not open the oven door during the first 15 minutes of baking time; as the soufflé nears the end of its baking, you may check its progress by opening the oven door slightly. (Be careful here; if your oven runs hot, the top of the soufflé may burn.) A quick dusting of confectioners' sugar is a nice finishing touch, but a soufflé waits for no one, so be ready to serve it immediately. Espresso beans, ground fine in a coffee grinder, will make this dessert soufflé taste like a tawny cappuccino. If you do not have espresso beans, substitute an equal amount of instant espresso, adding it along with the milk in step 2 so that it dissolves.

Ingredients

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