Barbecued Beef Brisket on the Gas Grill

Published July 1, 2007.

Why this recipe works:

We wanted to develop a barbecued beef brisket recipe with a deeply smoky flavor, and we wanted the recipe to work on our backyard grill. We used hickory wood chips, dividing them between two disposable pans, one with and one without water. The water in the one pan delayed the smoking of the… read more

We wanted to develop a barbecued beef brisket recipe with a deeply smoky flavor, and we wanted the recipe to work on our backyard grill. We used hickory wood chips, dividing them between two disposable pans, one with and one without water. The water in the one pan delayed the smoking of the chips, thus extending the time the brisket was exposed to smoke.

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Serves 8 to 10

We prefer hickory wood chips to smoke our brisket. Pecan, maple, oak, or fruitwoods such as apple, cherry, and peach also work well. It is best to avoid mesquite, which turns bitter during the long process of barbecuing. It is necessary to divide the wood chips between two disposable aluminum pans, one with and one without water. The water in the one pan will delay the smoking of the chips, thus extending the time the brisket is exposed to smoke. If your brisket is smaller than 5 pounds or the fat cap has been removed, or if you are using a small 2-burner gas grill, it may be necessary to build a foil shield in order to keep the brisket from becoming too dark. (See illustration below.) A 5- to 6-pound point-cut brisket can be used in the recipe, but because it is a thicker piece of meat it may need to be finished in the oven (see instructions in step 5 of recipe). If using the fattier point cut, omit the step of brining. Some of the traditional accompaniments to barbecued brisket include barbecue sauce (see our related recipe for Texas-Style Barbecue Sauce), sliced white bread or saltine crackers, pickle chips (see related pickle tasting), and thinly sliced onion.

Ingredients

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