Maple-Glazed Pork Roast with Smoked Paprika

Published March 1, 2003.

Why this recipe works:

An unexpected technique yielded tender, juicy pork when we experimented with our maple-glazed pork roast recipe. We found that searing the roast first on the stovetop ensured a crisp, caramelized crust before reducing the maple syrup in the skillet used to sear the pork. Roasting the pork in… read more

An unexpected technique yielded tender, juicy pork when we experimented with our maple-glazed pork roast recipe. We found that searing the roast first on the stovetop ensured a crisp, caramelized crust before reducing the maple syrup in the skillet used to sear the pork. Roasting the pork in that same skillet was the best way to get a beautifully glazed, perfectly cooked roast. The key to juicy pork: Don't overcook it. Today's pork can be safely served at 145 to 150 degrees, so we removed the pork from the oven at 135 degrees and let it rest on the cutting board before slicing.

less

Serves 4 to 6

A nonstick ovenproof skillet will be much easier to clean than a traditional one. Whichever you use, remember that the handle will be blistering hot when you take it out of the oven, so be sure to use a pot holder or oven mitt. Note that you should not trim the pork of its thin layer of fat. The flavor of grade B maple syrup (sometimes called "cooking maple") is stronger and richer than grade A, but grade A syrup will work well, too. This dish is unapologetically sweet, so we recommend side dishes that take well to the sweetness. Garlicky sauteed greens, braised cabbage, and soft polenta are good choices.

Ingredients

In My Favorites
Please Wait…
Remove Favorite
Add to custom collection