Easy Fresh Fruit Jam

Published July 1, 1998.

Why this recipe works:

When developing our ideal fruit jam recipe, we discovered that making a relatively small amount of jam at one time (this jam recipe produces about 2 1/2 cups) has several advantages. First, it allows for a thorough and even distribution of heat, which is crucial to proper jelling. It's also… read more

When developing our ideal fruit jam recipe, we discovered that making a relatively small amount of jam at one time (this jam recipe produces about 2 1/2 cups) has several advantages. First, it allows for a thorough and even distribution of heat, which is crucial to proper jelling. It's also easier to observe the progress of a small amount of jam, so you're less likely to let it overcook (which gets in the way of proper jelling). Finally, since you're not making industrial quantities, there's no need for canning. You can store it in the refrigerator for a couple of weeks—if it lasts that long.

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Makes 2 1/2 cups

The jam will continue to thicken as it cools, so err on the side of undercooking. Overcooked jam that is dark, thick, and smells of caramelized sugar cannot be saved. Note: Because of its reduced sugar amounts, this jam cannot be canned.

Ingredients

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