Peking Duck

Published September 1, 1993.

Why this recipe works:

The traditional Peking duck recipe takes time and intricate preparation. For our quicker and easier Peking duck recipe, we used modern tools—an electric fan and a metal hanger—to cut the drying time from three days to several hours. To get the skin as crisp as possible, we also used modern… read more

The traditional Peking duck recipe takes time and intricate preparation. For our quicker and easier Peking duck recipe, we used modern tools—an electric fan and a metal hanger—to cut the drying time from three days to several hours. To get the skin as crisp as possible, we also used modern tool—a basketball pump or straw—to pump air into the bird, which lifted the skin from the meat. To pull the fat right out of the bird, we filled a large wok or stockpot with boiling water and vinegar, then ladled the hot liquid over the duck's skin to open the pores, releasing the fat.

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Serves 4

Traditional recipes call for a duck with both the head and the feet still attached. Whole birds are available at Asian butcher shops in most major cities. This recipe can also be prepared using a supermarket duck. To make two ducks, double the amount of marinade, cilantro, and scallions, but keep the ingredients for the wok bath the same.

Ingredients

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