Simmered Country Ham

Published November 1, 1996.

Why this recipe works:

When developing our country ham recipe, we focused on the soaking and cooking method. Soaking a cured ham causes the salty meat to absorb water, thereby softening the ham and preventing excessive dryness. Soaking time depends on how long the ham has aged. Hams aged for fewer than six months… read more

When developing our country ham recipe, we focused on the soaking and cooking method. Soaking a cured ham causes the salty meat to absorb water, thereby softening the ham and preventing excessive dryness. Soaking time depends on how long the ham has aged. Hams aged for fewer than six months don't need to be soaked; hams aged for six months to a year should be soaked for 36 hours; and hams aged for more than a year should be soaked for three days, with the water being changed every day. As for cooking, we liked simmering, which adds a touch of moisture and makes it easier to remove the ham bone for more convenient serving, but we also developed a baked country ham recipe for people who prefer that method.

less

Serves 30

Any size ham can be adapted to this recipe; just adjust the cooking time depending ont he ham size. Bits of leftover ham can be mixed with cream cheese for a sandwich spread or ground to make deviled-style ham. Kale, cauliflower, spinach or cabbage flavored with country ham can be tossed with pasta or risotto. Use the hock to flavor a big pot of bean soup.

Ingredients

In My Favorites
Please Wait…
Remove Favorite
Add to custom collection