Glaze for Chiffon Cake

Published May 1, 1996.

Why this recipe works:

For an improved chiffon cake recipe that was light but rich, with deep flavor, we made some adjustments to the original chiffon cake recipe, which tended to collapse or explode because the structure base of this cake—flour and eggs—is so sensitive. Rather than whipping all of the egg whites… read more

For an improved chiffon cake recipe that was light but rich, with deep flavor, we made some adjustments to the original chiffon cake recipe, which tended to collapse or explode because the structure base of this cake—flour and eggs—is so sensitive. Rather than whipping all of the egg whites for this cake, we mixed some unbeaten egg whites into the dry ingredients along with the yolks, water, and oil. This provided the structure we were seeking to hold the cake together while also giving us the perfect chiffon cake: moist, tender, and flavorful.

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Makes enough for 1 chiffon cake

Since lumps in the confectioners' sugar don't dissolve completely in the liquid, they really show up once the cake is glazed. Unless you are certain that your sugar is lump-free, better to sift it. Before you glaze the cake, the crumbs must be scraped. With a fork or paring knife, gently scrape all the crust off the cake. To keep the serving plate from becoming smudged with glaze, slip small pieces of waxed paper beneath the cake edge all along the bottom. If making the milk variation, stir in one-half teaspoon of lemon juice to cut the intense sweetness.

Ingredients

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