Apple Pie with Dried Fruit

Published November 1, 1997.

Why this recipe works:

We wanted an apple pie recipe made with apples available everywhere at any time. To arrive at the tartness and texture we were after, we had to use two kinds of readily available apples, Granny Smith and McIntosh. The Grannies could be counted on for tartness and for keeping their shape during… read more

We wanted an apple pie recipe made with apples available everywhere at any time. To arrive at the tartness and texture we were after, we had to use two kinds of readily available apples, Granny Smith and McIntosh. The Grannies could be counted on for tartness and for keeping their shape during cooking; the Macs added flavor, and their otherwise frustrating tendency to become mushy became a virtue, providing a nice, juicy base for the harder Grannies. While many bakers add butter to their apple pie fillings, we found that it dulled the fresh taste of the apples and so did without it. Lemon juice, however, was essential to our apple pie recipe, counterbalancing the sweetness of the apples.

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Serves 8

If you are making this pie during the fall apple season, when many local varieties may be available, follow the recipe below using Macoun, Royal Gala, Empire, Winesap, Rhode Island Greening or Cortland apples. These are well-balanced apples, unlike Granny Smith, and work well on their own without thickeners or the addition of McIntosh. Placing the pie on a baking sheet in the oven inhibits cooking, so cover the bottom of the oven with a sheet of aluminum foil to catch a dripping juices. The pie is best eaten when cooled almost to room temperature, or even the next day.

Ingredients

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