Prebaked Pie Shell

Published September 1, 1997.

Why this recipe works:

While experimenting with our prebaked pie shell recipe, we found it was important to bake the pie shell sufficiently before removing the pie weights. Once the pan is in the oven, leave the foil lining and weights in place until the dough loses its wet look, turns an off-white from its original… read more

While experimenting with our prebaked pie shell recipe, we found it was important to bake the pie shell sufficiently before removing the pie weights. Once the pan is in the oven, leave the foil lining and weights in place until the dough loses its wet look, turns an off-white from its original pale yellow, and the edges just start to take on a very light brown color. Carefully (the dough is hot) touch the side of the shell to make sure that the crust is set: it should be firm and able to hold itself up. If you remove the weights too soon, the dough sides will slip down, ruining the pie shell.

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For an 8- to 9-inch single pie shell

Once the pan is in the oven, leave the foil lining and weights in place until the dough loses its wet look, turns an off-white from its original pale yellow, and the edges just start to take on a very light brown color. Carefully (the dough is hot) touch the side of the shell to make sure that the crust is set: firm and able to hold itself up. If you remove the weights too soon, the dough sides will slip down, ruining the pie shell. Bake the shell partially (another nine minutes)—until just golden brown—if the pie is to be baked again with an uncooked filling such as pumpkin or pecan pie or quiches. Bake the shell fully (another fifteen minutes from the point the foil is removed)—to a deep, golden brown—when no additional baking is required as with fruit tarts and cream, chiffon, or lemon meringue pies.

Ingredients

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