Oven-Baked Bread Stuffing with Sausage, Pecans, and Apricots

Published November 1, 1998.

Why this recipe works:

We wanted to come up with a side dish stuffing recipe that could be eaten with a variety of holiday roasts. After testing eight different kinds of bread, we settled on French for our stuffing recipe. It held up to the addition of liquid necessary for moistening, maintaining some structure and… read more

We wanted to come up with a side dish stuffing recipe that could be eaten with a variety of holiday roasts. After testing eight different kinds of bread, we settled on French for our stuffing recipe. It held up to the addition of liquid necessary for moistening, maintaining some structure and chew. To determine the content of the liquid ingredients, we tested several stuffings moistened with chicken stock that was combined variously with wine, port, brandy, and cream. Somewhat to our surprise, we returned to plain chicken stock. It delivered a clean taste that wouldn't compete with the other ingredients added to the stuffing.

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Serves 10 to 12 as a side dish

Dry whichever bread you choose by cutting 1/2-inch slices, laying them in a single layer on baking sheets or cooling racks, and leaving them out overnight. The next day, cut the slices into 1/2-inch cubes and allow them to dry for another night. If you are in a hurry, rush the process by drying the slices in a 225-degree oven until brittle but not brown, 30 to 40 minutes. Then cut them into cubes and proceed. Any of the stuffings can be cooked inside the holiday bird if you prefer; just reduce stock to 1 cup. Stuff a 12- to 15-pound turkey with 6 cups of stuffing. Then add an additional 1/2 cup of chicken stock to the remaining stuffing and bake it separately in an 8-inch pan. If you prefer to use fresh herbs, substitute 1 1/2 teaspoons minced fresh herbs for the dried sage, thyme, and marjoram.

Ingredients

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