Mango Fork

Published May 1, 2005.

Does this trident-shaped utensil really prevent a sticky mess when peeling mangos?

Overview:

This trident-shaped utensil is a mango fork, which is used to hold, peel, and eat the juicy fruit—all the while preventing a sticky mess. The long middle prong secures the seed while the short prongs grab onto the inner flesh.

To use a mango fork, insert the sharp middle prong straight through the stem end of the mango into the pit. Then hold the handle of the fork with one hand and use your free hand to peel the outer skin away from the flesh with a paring knife. At this point, you can either eat the mango directly off the fork, as you would a Popsicle, or slice the fruit from the pit.

While we still like our standard method of slicing through a mango on either side of the pit and cutting the fruit into slices or chunks, we enjoyed not having to worry about the slippery fruit sliding out of our hands and onto the floor.

This trident-shaped utensil is a mango fork, which is used to hold, peel, and eat the juicy fruit—all the while preventing a sticky mess. The long middle prong secures the seed while the short prongs grab onto the inner flesh.

To use a mango fork, insert the sharp middle prong straight through the stem end of the mango into the pit. Then hold the handle of the fork with one hand and use your free hand to peel the outer skin away from the flesh with a paring knife. At this point, you can either eat the mango directly off the fork, as you would a Popsicle, or slice the fruit from the pit.

While we still like our standard method of slicing through a mango on either side of the pit and cutting the fruit into slices or chunks, we enjoyed not having to worry about the slippery fruit sliding out of our hands and onto the floor.

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