Boning Knives

Published July 1, 2009. From Cook's Illustrated.

When it comes delicate tasks like trimming silver skin from tenderloins or removing the breast from a whole bird, a boning knife is best. Could our old favorite stand up to a host of new competitors?

Overview:

We love our sturdy chef's knife for tasks like chopping onions, hacking up chicken bones, or pushing through butternut squash. But when it comes to the intricate work of trimming silver skin from tenderloins or removing the breast from a whole bird, a boning knife is best. A good boning knife will be at least 6 inches long, very sharp, and agile, letting you maneuver nimbly around joints and bones. How would our favorite hold up next to newer models with innovative blades promising greater flexibility or smoother cutting? After testing, our old winner still reigned supreme—at a fraction of the cost of the other contenders.

We love our sturdy chef's knife for tasks like chopping onions, hacking up chicken bones, or pushing through butternut squash. But when it comes to the intricate work of trimming silver skin from tenderloins or removing the breast from a whole bird, a boning knife is best. A good boning knife will be at least 6 inches long, very sharp, and agile, letting you maneuver nimbly around joints and bones. How would our favorite hold up next to newer models with innovative blades promising greater flexibility or smoother cutting? After testing, our old winner still reigned supreme—at a fraction of the cost of the other contenders.

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